Ancient Greece: A Political, Social, and Cultural History

By Sarah B. Pomeroy; Stanley M. Burstein et al. | Go to book overview
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ART AND
ILLUSTRATION
CREDITS
1.1a Plan of the Minoan palace at Knossos. From Raimond Higgins, The Archaeology of Minoan Crete ( London: The Bodley Head, 1973), p. 41.
1.1b View of the ruins of the Minoan palace at Phaistos. Photo: The J. Allan Cash Photo Library, London.
1.2 Fresco of a fisherman from Thera. Athens, National Archaeological Museum. Photo: Bildarchiv Preussischer Kulturbesitz, Berlin.
1.3a Inlaid dagger. Athens, National Archaeological Museum. Photo: Hirmer Fotoarchiv, Munich.
1.3b Plan and cross section of the Kato Phoumos tholos tomb, Mycenae. Photo: British School, Athens.
1.3c Interior vault of a tholos tomb, Mycenae. Photo: Hirmer Fotoarchiv, Munich.
1.3d Gold mask from shaft graves, Mycenae. Athens, National Archaeological Museum. Photo: Foto Marburg/Art Resource, New York.
1.4b The megaron hall at Pylos. Photo: Alison Franz.
1.4c "The Lion Gate." Photo: Bildarchiv Preussischer Kulturbesitz, Berlin.
1.5a Linear B tablet from Mycenaean Knossos. From J. Chadwick, The Mycenaean World ( Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1976), p. 16. Reprinted by permission of publisher.
1.5b A chariot tablet from Mycenaean Knossos. After J. Chadwick, The Decipherment of Linear B, 2nd ed. ( Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1976), p. 108.
1.6a Statue of goddess figure from Knossos. Herakleion, Crete, Archaeological Museum. Photo: Foto Marburg /Art Resource, New York.
1.6b Gold ring from Knossos. Herakleion, Crete, Archaeological Museum. Photo: Hirmer Fotoarchiv, Munich.
1.7 Bronze plate armor and boar's tusk helmet. Nauplion Museum. Photo: German Archaeological Institute, Athens.
2.1a Submycenaean vase. Athens, Kerameikos Museum K2616. Photo: German Archaeological Institute, Athens.
2.1b Late Protogeometric vase. Athens, Kerameikos Museum K576. Photo: German Archaeological Institute, Athens.
2.2a "Village chieftain's house" at Nichoria. From William A. McDonald et al., Excavations at Nichoria in Southwest Greece: Vol. III, Dark Age and Byzantine Occupation ( Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press, 1983), pp. 36-37, Figs. 2-22 and 2-23. Reprinted by permission of publisher.
2.2b "Ordinary" Dark Age house. From William A. McDonald, Progress into the Past: The Rediscovery of Mycenaean Civilization, rev. ed. ( Bloomington: Indiana University Press, 1990), p. 368, fig. 103. Reprinted by permission of publisher.
2.3 Gold jewelry from the tomb of a rich Athenian Woman. Athens, Agora Museum. Photo: American School of Classical Studies at Athens.

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