The Last of the Mohicans: A Narrative of 1757

By James Fenimore Cooper; James Daugherty | Go to book overview

CHAPTER 27

"Ant. I shall remember: When Cæsar says Do this, it is performed." Julius Cæsar.

THE impatience of the savages who lingered about the prison of Uncas, as has been seen, had overcome their dread of the conjurer's breath. They stole cautiously, and with beating hearts, to a crevice, through which the faint light of the fire was glimmering. For several minutes they mistook the form of David for that of their prisoner; but the very accident which Hawkeye had foreseen occurred. Tired of keeping the extremities of his long person so near together, the singer gradually suffered the lower limbs to extend themselves, until one of his misshapen feet actually came in contact with and shoved aside the embers of the fire. At first the Hurons believed the Delaware had been thus deformed by witchcraft. But when David, unconscious of being observed, turned his head, and exposed his simple, mild countenance, in

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The Last of the Mohicans: A Narrative of 1757
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page 3
  • Introduction - How This Book Came to Be Written 5
  • Chapter I 11
  • Chapter 2 22
  • Chapter 3 33
  • Chapter 4 44
  • Chapter 5 54
  • Chapter 6 66
  • Chapter 7 79
  • Chapter 8 92
  • Chapter 9 103
  • Chapter 10 113
  • Chapter II 126
  • Chapter 12 141
  • Chapter 13 158
  • Chapter 14 170
  • Chapter 15 185
  • Chapter 16 197
  • Chapter 17 210
  • Chapter 18 226
  • Chapter 19 239
  • Chapter 20 253
  • Chapter 21 266
  • Chapter 22 278
  • Chapter 23 291
  • Chapter 24 306
  • Chapter 25 319
  • Chapter 26 333
  • Chapter 27 345
  • Chapter 28 356
  • Chapter 29 369
  • Chapter 30 384
  • Chapter 31 398
  • Chapter 32 408
  • Chapter 33 426
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