X
The General Line: The Grand Alliance

The story has been generally accepted that, at the very moment when the Stalin-Hitler war broke out, the British communists threw themselves enthusiastically into a policy of National Unity. Nothing could be farther from the truth. Western communists, naturally, greeted with an outburst of fury Hitler's attack upon their real and only fatherland. But stronger than their hatred of Nazi aggression was their hatred of their own countries. They attempted to continue a line almost indistinguishable from their previous line, until Moscow forced them to abandon their antics.

'This attack is the sequel of the secret moves which have been taking place behind the curtain of the Hess mission. We warn the people against the upper-class reactionaries in Britain and the United States who will seek by every means to reach an understanding with Hitler on the basis of the fight against the Soviet Union. Only the action of the people can prevent this. We have no confidence in the present government, dominated by Tory friends of fascism and coalition labour leaders, who have already shown their stand by their consistent anti-Soviet campaigns.'

Thus World News and Views on June 28th greeted the outbreak of the new war and Churchill's offer of solidarity with the USSR in its self-made predicament. The party slogans issued at the same time make this policy clearer still. Proclaiming solidarity with the USSR, they request:

'An immediate military and diplomatic agreement between Britain and the USSR;

'Remove all pro-fascist and anti-Soviet reactionaries from places of power in the government, diplomatic services or military command;

-265-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
European Communism
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 566

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.