A Treasury of Jewish Letters: Letters from the Famous and the Humble - Vol. 1

By Franz Kobler | Go to book overview

9
Jerusalem's Call to the exiled Teacher of the Pharisees

ALEXANDER JANNAI, the Hasmonean, became High Priest and King of Judaea in 103 B.C.E. He attached himself to the Sadducean or aristocratic party in the State, and soon became intensely hated by the Pharisees, the popular party formed by the faithful custodians of the sacred tradition. The tension between the High Priest and the Pharisees exploded during a service in the Temple on the feast of Tabernacles. The worshippers, most of whom were Pharisees, gathered in the Temple, the customary palms and citrons in their hands. As the ceremony of the water libation was about to be performed, all eyes were fixed on the High Priest. The crowd was thunderstruck when he poured the water on the ground, as the Sadducees prescribed, instead of against the altar, as ordained by the Pharisees. In a flash, hundreds of citrons whizzed through the enormous hall towards the spot where Alexander stood, though without causing him injury. Infuriated by this outrage, he at once ordered his mercenaries to attack the rebellious worshippers. It was said that six thousand people lost their lives on the spot.

The ruthless persecution which followed this incident caused a flight of the most prominent Pharisees from the Holy Land. Among them was the leading Pharisaic teacher, Judah ben Tabbai, who took refuge in Alexandria. There he remained until the end of Alexander Jannai's reign. The King, after having relented in his enmity towards the Pharisees, on his deathbed advised his wife, the Queen Salome Alexandra, who was to succeed him, to make peace with them. One of her first acts accordingly was to invite Judah ben Tabbai to return to Jerusalem. Thus, c. 76 B.C.E., a letter reached the sage, the shortest and the most subtle call ever sent to an exile:


JERUSALEM TO JUDAH BEN TABBAI

'How long will my bridegroom live among you?'

[Jerusalem, about 76 B.C.E.]

From Jerusalem the great to Alexandria the little.

How long will my bridegroom live among you, and I remain separated from him in distress?1

The author of these picturesque lines was another outstanding Pharisee, Simeon ben Shetah, the brother of the Queen. He also had fled to Egypt

-44-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
A Treasury of Jewish Letters: Letters from the Famous and the Humble - Vol. 1
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 328

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.