The Meaning of Yalta: Big Three Diplomacy and the New Balance of Power

By John L. Snell; Forrest C. Pogue et al. | Go to book overview

Bibliographical Essay

The footnotes for this volume are designed to provide an extended guide to the sources upon which each chapter is based. The most important source for all chapters on the actual discussions at Yalta is: United States, Department of State, The Conferences at Malta and Yalta, 1945 ( Washington, 1955), hereinafter cited as Yalta Papers.

At least as early as 1948 congressmen demanded the publication of the "secret" story of Yalta. The Republican party platform of 1952, whose foreign policy plans were purportedly written by John Foster Dulles, declared: "The Government of the United States under Republican leadership will repudiate all commitments contained in secret understandings such as those at Yalta which aid Communist enslavement." This interest in the Yalta conference may have prompted the 1953 enthusiasm for the State Department's publication program. The State Department tends to confirm this in its Foreword statement that the Yalta Papers are "part of a special Foreign Relations publication program prepared by the Department of State in response to expressions of interest by several Senators and the Senate Committee on Appropriations in its report for the fiscal year 1954."

Certain general statements can be made about the publication of the Yalta Papers. First, it is unusual to have such emphasis on the early publication of conference minutes. The volumes on the Paris Peace Conference did not appear for many years after World War I. Secondly, while it has been the policy of the State Department for many decades to publish foreignpolicy documents, special care was always taken to clear their contents with the governments concerned. In the case of the Yalta Papers, the final assent of the British government was apparently gained at almost the moment the papers were released. Thirdly, the papers which have been published in the past have been edited to remove indiscreet "asides" which might embarrass individuals still in office. This was not done in

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The Meaning of Yalta: Big Three Diplomacy and the New Balance of Power
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Preface xi
  • Contents xv
  • Illustrations and Maps 1
  • Chapter I - The Struggle for a New Order 3
  • Chapter II - What to Do with Germany? 37
  • Chapter III - Russian Power in Central-Eastern Europe 75
  • Chapter IV - Yalta and the Far East 127
  • Chapter V - The Big Three and the United Nations 167
  • Chapter VI - Yalta in Retrospect 188
  • Appendix 209
  • Bibliographical Essay 218
  • Index 231
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