History of New England - Vol. 1

By John Gorham Palfrey | Go to book overview

CHAPTER V.

THE narrow peninsula, sixty miles long, which terminates in Cape Cod, projects eastwardly from the mainland of Massachusetts, in shape resembling the human arm bent rectangularly at the elbow and again at the wrist. In the basin enclosed landward by the extreme point of this projection, in the roadstead of what is now Provincetown, the Mayflower dropped her anchor at noon on a Saturday near the close of autumn. The exigencies of a position so singular demanded an organization adequate to the pres. ervation of order and of the common safety, and the following instrument was prepared and signed:1

The May- flower at Cape Cod. 1620. Nov. 11.

____________________
1
"This day, before we came to harbor, observing some not well affected to unity and concord, but gave some appearance of faction, it was thought good there should be an association and agreement, that we should combine together in one body, and to submit to such government and governors as we should by common consent agree to make and choose, and set our hands to this that follows, word for word." ( Mourts' Relation, 3.) -- "Some of the strangers among them had let fall from them in the ship, that, when they came ashore, they would use their own liberty, for none had power to command them, the patent they had being for Virginia, and not for New England, which belonged to another government, with which the Virginia Company had nothing to do." ( Bradford, History, 89.) -- Morton ( Memorial, Davis edit, 38) appends to the instrument forty-one names. He doubtless took the compact from Bradford's History or Mourt Relation, neither of which contains names of subscribers. Bradford list (447-450) of male passengers in the Mayflower has seven names of males, apparently adults, additional to those of the signers in Morton. They are Roger Wilder, Elias, Story, Solomon Prower, John Langemore, Robert Carter, William Holbeck, and Edward Thomson. If to these be added "two seamen hired to stay a year here in the country, William Trevore and one Ely," who, "when their time was out, both returned" (Ibid., 450), we have, including the women and children mentioned by Bradford, a hundred and two for the total number of the company. The same number came to land as had left England. One ( William Button) died, and one ( Oceanus Hopkins) was born, on the passage.

Mourt's "Relation or Journal," quoted --

-164-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
History of New England - Vol. 1
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page i
  • Title Page iii
  • Preface. vii
  • List of Illustrations xviii
  • Contents - Of the First Volume. xix
  • Chapter I 1
  • Chapter II 51
  • Chapter III 101
  • Chapter IV 133
  • Chapter V 164
  • Chapter VI 198
  • Chapter VII 239
  • Chapter VIII 283
  • Chapter IX 331
  • Chapter X 383
  • Chapter XI 426
  • Chapter XII 471
  • Chapter XIII 522
  • Chapter XIV 560
  • Chapter XV 610
  • Appendix. 635
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 640

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.