History of New England - Vol. 1

By John Gorham Palfrey | Go to book overview

CHAPTER IX.

IT has been mentioned, that, at the time to which the history of the Massachusetts Colony has been brought down, the older settlement at Plymouth had increased to the number of about three hundred persons, and that, about the time of the discharge from their engagements to the London partners, they had extended their trading operations both to the east and to the west. The place of the crazy Rogers, the minister brought over by Allerton, and soon sent back, was supplied by Smith, who had come with Higginson's fleet. Some of the Plymouth people found him at Nantasket, "weary of being in that uncouth place, and in a poor house that would neither keep him nor his goods dry. So seeing him to be a grave man, and understood he had been a minister, though they had no order for any such thing, yet they presumed and brought him. He was here accordingly kindly entertained and housed, . . . . . and exercised his gifts among them, and afterwards was chosen into the ministry, and so remained for sundry years."1

1629. June.

A few weeks before the new minister came, thirty-five members of the Leyden church had joined their friends, accomplishing a long-deferred hope of both parties. The poor people at Plymouth, just involved in new pecuniary obligations to an oppressive amount, were but too happy, not only to defray all the expenses of the new-comers, but to give them dwellings, and supply them with food for more than a

August. Renewed emigration from Leyden.

____________________
1
Bradford, 363. -- Smith probably left Plymouth in 1635. (See Mass. Hist. Coll., IV. 108.)

-331-

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