Antislavery: The Crusade for Freedom in America

By Dwight Lowell Dumond | Go to book overview
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ILLUSTRATIONS
Appraisal and settlement of a slave estateend-papers
The slave ship4
Cornell University Library
The terror in Africa6
Cornell University Library
The march to the sea7
Cornell University Library
Slave branding10
From Armistead, Five Hundred Thousand Strokes for Freedom
Negroes for sale; Thirty seasoned Negroes13
Library of Congress
Branding slaves14
Anti-Slavery Almanac, 1840
Hunting slaves with dogs and guns15
Anti-Slavery Almanac, 1840
Granville Sharp18
From a model in wax by Andras
Thomas Clarkson18
From a model in wax by Andras
Benjamin Rush21
From a painting by Sully, William L. Clements
Library
Samuel Hopkins22
William L. Clements Library
The American Declaration of Independence illustrated23
Lithograph by R. Thayer, Library of Congress
"H" stands for Harvest25
From Gray, Gospel of Slavery
George Mason27
William L. Clements Library
Always a slave! Never a man!31
Library of Congress
The crime against motherhood32
Library of Congress
Inspection and sale of a Negro35
Library of Congress
Roger Sherman37
From a painting by Chappel, William L. Clements
Library
James Wilson38
William L. Clements Library
Stowing the cargo on a slaver at night39
By Henry Howe, Library of Congress
Capture of a slaver off the coast of Cuba42
From Illustrated London News, Library of Congress
The Penitential Tyrant, by Thomas Branagan45
Ezra Stiles48
William L. Clements Library
Kidnapping a free Negro51
From Torrey, Portraiture of Domestic Slavery
Elias Boudinot54
Engraving by Paradise, William L. Clements Library
Driven to the fields without respite56
Library of Congress
View of the Capitol at Washington58
Liberty Almanac, 1847
Victims of kidnapping60
From Torrey, Portraiture of Domestic Slavery
The land of the free64
From the pictorial Slave Market of America
The home of the oppressed65
From the Slave Market of America
Slave house of J. W. Neal & Co.67
From the Slave Market of America
Selling a mother from her child69
Anti-Slavery Almanac, 1840
Separation of a mother from her last child70
From Northup, Twelve Years a Slave
Sale of estates, pictures, and slaves71
Leeds Anti-Slavery Series, No. 16
Can a mother forget her suckling child?72
From Narrative of the Life and Adventures of Henry Bibb
Sales by auction of men, women, and children72
From Armistead, Five Hundred Thousand Strokes for Freedom
Husband and wife, after being sold74
From Branagan, Preliminary Essay
Slave suicide75
From Torrey, Portraiture of Domestic Slavery
Head frames and log necklace78-79
From Branagan, Penitential Tyrant
Whipping slaves82
From Branagan, Penitential Tyrant
Treadmill scene in Jamaica86
The African slave trade89
Library of Congress
Whipping of Amos Dresser94
From Narrative of Amos Dresser
A slave caught without a pass110
Anti-Slavery Record, No. 17
How slavery improves the condition of women111
Anti-Slavery Almanac, 1840
Whipping slaves112
From Walker, Picture of Slavery for Youth

-viii-

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Antislavery: The Crusade for Freedom in America
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