Please update your browser

You're using a version of Internet Explorer that isn't supported by Questia.
To get a better experience, go to one of these sites and get the latest
version of your preferred browser:

Antislavery: The Crusade for Freedom in America

By Dwight Lowell Dumond | Go to book overview

Chapter 10
THE OLD NORTHWEST

We discussed earlier the powers given to Congress to prevent the spread of slavery and the forces creating an almost irresistible pressure for its expansion. The first contest over expansion came between 1787 and 1821 and involved the Northwest Territory and the Missouri Valley. The two areas were inseparable in the political and judicial contest. It involved the power of Congress to exclude slavery from the Northwest Territory by the Ordinance of 1787; the power of Congress to impose binding provisions on states at the time of admission; the constitutional right of a state to disregard such provisions by changing its constitution after admission; and the force of conditions stated in the surrender of Virginia's claims and in Jay's Treaty. The Congress, the President, the territorial governors and councils, the territorial legislatures, the constitutional conventions, and the judges of the several courts were all involved in the contest. It was, however, largely a political question.

Some settlers in the Old Northwest were willing to own slaves in order to profit from the labor and natural increase. Some wanted servants and the social prestige of slave ownership. But the drive to introduce slavery here, as was true in regard to the trans-Mississippi region at a later date, came from the aggressive character of the slave power. It was psychological in origin, and it had all the attributes of power politics. Slavery in Ohio, Indiana, and Illinois would mean slavery in Missouri and the Missouri Valley, and a political alliance of great strength.

The Ordinance of 1787, as we have seen, prohibited slavery in the existing national domain; and the Constitution, drafted at the same time, forbade Congress to use its authority for twenty years to prevent "the migration or importation of such persons as any of the states now existing shall think proper to admit." No where else do we find the terms "states now existing" and "original states." They were coined for the specific purpose of confining slavery to its then existing limits. The Northern states, slave and free, had abandoned their claims to western lands that new states might be created from a national domain. There were to be no slaves in this Northwest Territory, which was all the territory under federal jurisdiction free of state claims, but that prohibition was not to be construed to free fugitives from the existing slave states. Nothing was said about new slave states -- there were not to be any. Virginia, North Carolina, South Carolina, and Georgia, however, never lived up to their agreement. They delayed a surrender of their claims to the region south of the Ohio until slavery had invaded it and then qualified their action with a condition that the new states be slave states.

Said a Committee of the Delaware Society for Promoting the Abolition of Slavery: "If it had been suggested, that one object of the union, was not only to perpetuate the odious state of slavery, but to extend it beyond its present limits; that so far from a right being reserved to the federal government to restrict the evil, they might be compelled to aid its extension; the accusation

-96-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Antislavery: The Crusade for Freedom in America
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 422

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.