Antislavery: The Crusade for Freedom in America

By Dwight Lowell Dumond | Go to book overview

Chapter 20
THE AMERICAN ANTI-SLAVERY SOCIETY

The antislavery movement did not begin with the organization of the American Anti-Slavery Society in December 1833. That would seem to be a simple truism at this point in our discussion, but it needs re-emphasis. The movement began with the Quakers and continued with the Presbyterians and Baptists. In pre-Revolutionary days, it was largely denominational with the Quakers, less so with the Presbyterians and Baptists. It ceased to be strictly denominational with the organization of the Eastern abolition societies in the post-Revolutionary period. It broadened out in the evangelism of the 1820's, but remained largely Presbyterian and Congregational even during the 1830's. The movement, however, was as much political as it was religious, even more so. We have traced it in the political treatises of the Revolutionary period; in the legislative acts and court decisions of those states which abolished slavery; in the debates of the Constitutional Convention, the Congresses of the United States both before and after 1789, and the conventions of new states; and in the climactic public discussion of the Missouri question. The movement, then, was both religious and political, and it did not suddenly change with the organization of the American Anti-Slavery Society in 1833, nor with the schism in the society in 1840.

Early in 1831 in New York City a small group of men began to pull together for the first time the widely scattered threads of moral democracy reaching back to pre-Revolutionary days. They were Lewis Tappan, George Bourne, Joshua Leavitt, Simeon Jocelyn, William Goodell, and Theodore Weld.1 What a combination of intellect, courage, and Christian faith! What a solid foundation of antislavery tradition, evangelistic fervor, and equalitarianism! Tappan represented the Eastern liberal tradition of opposition to slavery and aid to the Negroes extending back to Woolman and Benezet, and including in its long history men like Benjamin Franklin, Benjamin Rush, William Rawle, John Jay, Rufus King, Theodore Dwight, and Elias Boudinot. Tappan spoke always for his brother Arthur also, and for the numerous wealthy patrons of Christian benevolence in New York City.

George Bourne, who had said that "every man who holds Slaves and who pretends to be a Christian or a Republican, is either an incurable Idiot who cannot distinguish good from evil, or an obdurate sinner who resolutely defies every social, moral, and divine requisition," represented the Presbyterian preachers from the South whose opposition to slavery had led to exile, including men like Gilliland and Rankin.2

Joshua Leavitt was a stolid New England lawyer and preacher, trained at Yale by the liberal Nathaniel Taylor. He edited the New YorkEvangelist, the paper founded by the Tappans to expound and popularize in New York City the new theology of Charles Grandison Finney. He had been writing against slavery since 1825 and was destined to be, as editor of the Independent after 1848, one of the most respected journalists in the country.3

Simeon S. Jocelyn was a home missionary serving the Negroes of New Haven. He was busily

-175-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Antislavery: The Crusade for Freedom in America
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 422

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.