The Art and Architecture of Ancient America: The Mexican, Maya, and Andean Peoples

By George Kubler | Go to book overview

LIST OF PLATES
All dates are A.D. unless otherwise indicated Where copyright credit in photographs it not specifically given, it is due solely to the gallery or collection given as the location
1 Pottery figurine from Tlatilco, before 500 B.C. New Haven, Yale University Art Gallery, Olsen Collection
2 Teotihuacán, Ciudadela court, before 600. From the south ( I.N.A.H.)
3 Teotihuacán, Ciudadela, inner face of the central pyramid, before 500 ( I.N.A.H.)
4 Water Goddess, colossal basalt figure from Teotihuacán, before 700. Height 10 1/2 ft. Mexico City, Museo Nacional de Antropología (Photo courtesy L. Aveleyra)
5 (A )Stone ocelot-vessel from the foot of the Pyramid of the Sun at Teotihuacán, before 700. London, British Museum

(B ) Alabaster face panel. Teotihuacán style, before 700. Florence,Officina Pietre Dure (Gabinetto Fotografico Nazionale, Rome)

6 Teotihuacán, wall painting from the 'Temple of Agriculture' (lost or destroyed), Period II (?) (After Gamio)
7 Tepantitla, near Teotihuacán, wall painting, Period III (?) ( I.N.A.H.)
8 (A ) Xochicalco, main pyramid, angle of lower platform, eighth-ninth centuries ( I.N.A.H.)

(B ) Tula, north pyramid facing, thirteenth century ( I.N.A.H.)

9 Tula, basalt Atlantean figures, thirteenth century. Height 15 ft ( A.M.N.H.)
10 Tula, basalt pier relief of Toltec warrior, thirteenth century ( A.M.N.H.)
11 (A )Tula, coatepantli (serpent wall), thirteenth century ( John Glass)

(B ) Tula, basalt Chacmool, thirteenth century ( I.N.A.H.)

12 (A ) Codex Xolotl: The Tlailotlac. Chichimec chronicle, sixteenth century. Paris, Bibliothèque Nationale

(B ) Tenochtitlan, detail from a sixteenth-century plan of a pre-Conquest portion. Mexico City, Museo Nacional de Antropología (Courtesy Donald Robertson)

13 (A )Calixtlahuaca, round pyramid, after 1476 ( I.N.A.H.)

(B ) Malinalco, rock-cut temple, after 1476. From the south-west ( I.N.A.H.)

14 Cylindrical stone of Tizoc from main temple enclosure, Tenochtitlan, after 1483. Diameter 8 1/2 ft. Mexico City, Museo Nacional de Antropología
15 (A )Stone slab commemorating Tizoc and Ahuitzol from main temple enclosure, Tenochtitlan, dated Fight Reed ( I487). Mexico City, Museo National de Antropología

(B ) Stone model of a Pyramid of Sacred Warfare found on site of Moctezuma's Palace, Tenochtitlan, c. 1500. Height 4 ft. Mexico City, Museo Nacional de Antropología (Photo Irmgard Groth Kimball)

16 (A ) Calendar stone found near main temple enclosure, Tenochtitlan, carved after 1502. Diameter 11 1/2 ft. Mexico City, Museo Nacional de Antropologia

(B ) Stone vessel for heart sacrifices, probably from Tenochtitlan, c. 1500. Vienna, Museum für Völkerkunde

17 (A ) Wooden drum from Malinalco, c. 1500. Mexico City, Museo Nacional de Antropología

(B ) Wooden drum, c. I5oo. Toluca, Museo (After Saville)

18 Stone face panel representing Xipe Totec, probably from Tenochtitlan, c. 1500. London, British Museum
19 Greenstone statuette of Xipe Totec from Tenango del Valle, Valley of Mexico, c. 1500. Washington, National Gallery, Bliss Collection
20 Andesite statue of the goddess Coatlicue, found in main plaza, Mexico City, late fifteenth century. Height 99 1/4 in. Mexico City, Museo Nacional de Antropología
21 Deity in parturition from the Valley of Mexico (?), c. 1500. Aplite. Washington, Notional Gallery, Bliss Collection
22 Stone tiger-vessel for blood sacrifices, from Tenochtitlan, c. 1500. Mexico City, Museo National de Antropología

-xvii-

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