Forbidden Adventures: The History of the American Comics Group

By Michael Vance | Go to book overview

artists were flocking to Detroit, Florida, and California for work. And a comic book industry (including Donenfeld and Pines), hungry for talent, began to snatch crumbs from the tables of the animation studios. One agent who supplied those "crumbs" from the animation crowd was Pines' father-in-law, B. W Sangor. Using moonlighting animators, illustrators from pulp magazines, and new, untested talent, Sangor began to funnel hundreds of pages of art and story to Pines, as well as to Donenfeld and other publishers. These super-talents of animation were so prolific that Sangor began to skim off pages for his own adventures in the world of publishing. His publishing house was named Creston, and the final piece that would become ACG was added to the puzzle.

In retrospect, ACG's accomplishments from 1943 to 1967 remain impressive today Unnumbered hundreds of thousands of ACG readers have had moments of epiphany forever etched into their memories as they traveled on forbidden adventures into unknown worlds of imagination.

Written for scholars but accessible to comic book fans and casual readers as well, this book is intended for an people interested in comic books and in the history of the men and women who created them during the early days of the most popular art form in the world.


NOTES
1.
Al Capp, The World of Li'l Abner, Ballantine Books, 1953, Introduction.
2.
Maria Reidelbach, Completely Mad: A History of the Comic Book and Magazine ( Little, Brown & Company, 1991),9.

-6-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Forbidden Adventures: The History of the American Comics Group
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 164

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.