Far Eastern Governments and Politics: China and Japan

By Paul M. A. Linebarger; Djang Chu et al. | Go to book overview

CHAPTER TWELVE
The Florescence of Japanese Dual Government

IF GOVERNMENT on the T'ang model is considered the first government of a truly civilized and literate Japan, the long period of shogunal government can be considered the second major governmental form. For almost a thousand years the Japanese moved onward, constant in change, developing from within their own resources of imagination, intellect, scholarship, and tradition a special kind of government peculiar to themselves alone. More than any other civilized people on earth they developed dualism.

Dualism is a political tradition that sets up one government for the purpose of reigning, while leaving the practice of ruling to another. In Europe an analogy can be found in the coexistence of the mayors of the palace and the kings of the French monarchy of the late Merovingian period, or in the coexistence of the Holy Roman Emperor with the Pope in those times when both stood forth as secular rulers. No European dualism attained the completeness reached in Japan.

The source of Japanese dualism can perhaps be found in a psychological characteristic, true of all human beings, which leads any anxious or greedy person to desire things in duplicate. In its most innocent form, this desire is manifested by the possession of an ordinary set of table silver for everyday use and a choice set preserved for special occasions which may never arise. In American life the untouchable and unusable parlor, where no one ever went except for funerals, disasters, or the reception of the local preacher, is a characteristic of the psychological need to keep something so good that it cannot be used.

No matter how one approaches it, Japanese character has its own particular and rather admirable strain of compulsiveness. A typically Japanese obsession, cleanliness, is one Japanese characteristic of this strain. Another

-289-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Far Eastern Governments and Politics: China and Japan
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 644

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.