Seldom Ask, Never Tell: Labor and Discourse in Appalachia

By Anita Puckett | Go to book overview

3
PARTICIPANT FRAMEWORKS INDEXED BY REQUESTING DISCOURSE

"That's not right."

A local man "drops by" a trailer I'm renting while the landlord is repairing some wiring. After a greeting, the landlord asks the visitor if he "needs" something, to which the visitor replies, "No, I just stopped by to see if you needed some help." After about 15 minutes of conversation about various noncontroversial topics as well as commentary about the cause and best remedies for the task at hand, the visitor asks if the landlord "happens" to own any metric-gauged rachets. The landlord replies, "Yeah, do ya need to borrer them?" "Yeah, thanks." The landlord hands him the box of rachets that have been sitting on top of the dryer the whole time. [notes 8/90]

As I visited a local store one afternoon, a woman stopped by with some items to be delivered to the clerk's sister-in-law. After a greeting and some brief conversation, the patron indicated that she "needs" to get these items to Mable [the clerk's sister-in- law]. The clerk replied, "I don't care to glt it to her." [notes 9/85]

ASH CREEK RESIDENTS COMMUNICATE REQUESTS 1 through a repertoire of various verbal, nonverbal, and, very rarely, literate requesting practices. This repertoire contains discourse tokens that are highly conventional in form and appear in routine interactions, not only in interactions with "belongin" network members but also with others in the immediate area and in town. Commonly, verbal forms are single words, short phrases, or abbreviated versions of longer, more formal requesting sequences. Verbal requesting discourse uses deictics, personal pronouns, and concrete nouns as presuppositional and creative indexes to reproduce culturally significant meanings about socioeconomic relationships. Requests are rarely imperatives, although they can have directive force similar to imperatives and can

-51-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Seldom Ask, Never Tell: Labor and Discourse in Appalachia
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 314

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.