Seldom Ask, Never Tell: Labor and Discourse in Appalachia

By Anita Puckett | Go to book overview
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APPENDIX A
PARTICIPANTS

Each interlocutor whose speech is transcribed or who is referenced in transcrip-
tions more than once in this volume are, except for me, assigned a unique pseud-
onym. This rhetorical device, recommended by DuBois et al. ( 1993), aids in reading
the texts and provides some continuity in recognizing speakers across texts. Fol-
lowing are biographical sketches about each speaker based on 1986 information:

Abe Young adult man in late twenties who is not from Ash Creek.
Married Bill's daughter, Heather, and lives up a holler away from
the geographical center of Ash Creek social life. Has two young
children. Travels two hours each way to Kingsport, Tennessee,
daily for work as an electronics salesman. Family moved from Ash
Creek about 1989.
Anne Nonlocal grade school teacher who moved to Ash Creek as a "back
to lander" who wanted to escape the pressures of city life. Taught
in county grade school and taught community college extension
classes at the Environmental Center. Shared house with Cindy
and her children. No longer lives in Ash Creek.
Bernie Older man born in Ash Creek who is a trained United Brethren
minister. Oversees mission on Ash Creek; former Environmen-
tal Center director. Has a wife and two grown daughters and one
son. Married daughter and family live next to him on family land;
son is also a minister who lives at the mission. Bernie passed away
in the early 1990s.
Betty Older, widowed woman born in Ash Creek who ran a local mom
and pop store. Store was closed in 1989.
Bill Older widower in midfifties who works for the Environmental
Center as a night watchman. Born in Ash Creek and has strong

-217-

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