The Oxford Book of Sixteenth Century Verse

By E. K. Chambers | Go to book overview

INDEX OF FIRST LINES
The references are to pages.
A blast of wind, a momentary breath 633
A day, a night, an hour of sweet content 824
A face that should content me wonders well 50
A harder lesson to learn continence 268
A woman's looks 855
About their prince each took his wonted seat 800
Absence, the noble truce 206
Adieu, farewell earth's bliss 429
Advance your choral motions now 827
After long storms and tempests' sad assay 321
Against my Love shall be, as I am now 688
Ah! my heart, ah! what aileth thee 69
Ah sweet Content! where is thy mild abode? 631
Ah! were she pitiful as she is fair 370
Ah! what is love? It is a pretty thing 379
Alas my Love! ye do me wrong 152
Alas! so all things now do hold their peace. 82
Alas! 'tis true I have gone here and there 698
All suddenly a stormy whirlwind blew 278
Amidst the fairest mountain tops 197
An evil spirit, your beauty, haunts me still 600
And if I did, what then? 142
And is there care in heaven? and is there love 274
And now at length the joyful time drew on 609
And when thou hast on foot the purblind hare 637
And wilt thou leave me thus? 62
And would you see my mistress' face? 843
April is in my mistress' face 505
Are they shadows that we see? 562
Art thou poor, yet hast thou golden slumbers? 735
As I in hoary winter's night stood shivering in the snow 236
As it fell upon a day 726
As Love is cause of joy 345
As the holly groweth green 34
As to the blooming prime 797
As withereth the primrose by the river 796
As years do grow, so cares increase 138
As you came from the holy land 468
At her fair hands how have I grace entreated 811

-891-

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