French Women and the Age of Enlightenment

By Samia I. Spencer | Go to book overview

French Women
and the
Age of Enlightenment

EDITED BY
Samia I. Spencer

INDIANA UNIVERSITY PRESS
Bloomington

-iii-

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French Women and the Age of Enlightenment
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Foreword ix
  • Preface Perilous Visibilities xi
  • Introduction 1
  • Notes 25
  • I- Women and Political Life 31
  • Women and the Law 33
  • Notes 46
  • Women and Politics 49
  • Notes 61
  • Women, Democracy, and Revolution in Paris, 1789-1794 64
  • Notes 77
  • II- Women and Society 81
  • Notes 94
  • Women and Family 97
  • Notes 107
  • Women and Work 111
  • Notes 124
  • Women versus Clergy, Women Pro Clergy 128
  • Notes 137
  • III- Women and Culture 141
  • Women as Muse 143
  • Notes 152
  • Women and the Theatre Arts 155
  • Notes 166
  • Women and Music- Ornament of the Profession? 170
  • Notes 178
  • Women in Science 181
  • Notes 193
  • IV- Creative Women and Women Artists 195
  • The Novelists and Their Fictions 197
  • Notes 209
  • The Memorialists 212
  • Notes 224
  • The Epistolières 226
  • Notes 239
  • Women and the Visual Arts 242
  • Notes 252
  • V- The Philosophes- Feminism And/Or Antifeminism? 257
  • Women and the Encyclopédie 259
  • Notes 270
  • Montesquieu and Women 272
  • Notes 284
  • Voltaire and Women 285
  • Notes 295
  • Diderot and Women 296
  • Notes 306
  • Rousseau''s "Antifeminism" Reconsidered 309
  • Notes 316
  • VI- Portrayal of Women in French Literature 319
  • The Death of an Ideal- Female Suicides in the Eighteenth- Century French Novel 321
  • Notes 330
  • The Problem of Sexual Equality in Sadean Prose 332
  • Notes 342
  • The Edifying Examples 345
  • Notes 353
  • VII- Portrayal of French Women in Other European Literatures 355
  • The View from England 357
  • Notes 365
  • The View from Germany 369
  • Notes 378
  • The View from Russia 380
  • Notes 393
  • The View from Spain- Rococo Finesse and Esprit versus Plebeian Manners 395
  • Notes 405
  • The Legacy of the Eighteenth Century- A Look at the Future 407
  • Notes 415
  • Contributors 416
  • Index 421
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