Spectral Evidence: The Ramona Case: Incest, Memory, and Truth on Trial in Napa Valley

By Moira Johnston | Go to book overview

5
Confrontation

The night before Gary left for Orange County, Stephanie lay in bed with him, pretending to be asleep. There was an old movie on TV about a rape case, an innocent man accused. She could hardly stand the irony. She didn't dare move, afraid Gary would hear her swallow. At the end of the movie, the voiceover urged viewers to make a phone call -- for information about rape -- and gave the number. Gary picked up the phone and she thought, "Oh, my God, he's calling there." But he was just picking up his messages from the winery.

"So he knows," Stephanie thought as Gary left the house the next morning, the day before his meeting with Holly. They looked at each other, and he gave her a kiss. Gary had stopped kissing Stephanie when they got married. Even if he was leaving for Europe, he didn't kiss her. This was not a kiss to go down to Southern California and be back in two days. It was something only a wife would know. It was good-bye. Stephanie wanted to say so many things. She wanted to know why, not if. She wanted to talk to her husband. But she had promised Holly. "I never got to say good-bye."

On Monday, March 12, Holly was admitted to Western Medical Center to be evaluated by Rose before the sodium amytal interview was scheduled. The young woman was more seriously ill than any of her family, or even Holly herself, fully understood. She was suffering from major depression; her bulimia had worsened, with bingeing and forced vomiting alternating with sieges of obsessive exercising; and

-96-

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Spectral Evidence: The Ramona Case: Incest, Memory, and Truth on Trial in Napa Valley
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Prologue the Memory Wars 1
  • A Perfect Family 11
  • 1 - A World of Women 13
  • 2 - The Birth of a Salesman 34
  • 3 - The Family Table 51
  • 4 - Flashbacks 76
  • 5 - Confrontation 96
  • Discovery 105
  • 6 - A Family Falls Apart 107
  • 7 - A Mother Knows 122
  • 8 - The Christmas Present 141
  • 9 - This Thing Called Repression 155
  • 10 - The Gathering of Evidence 172
  • 11 - The Gathering of Witnesses 189
  • 12 - The Memory Lesson 210
  • The Trial 233
  • 13 - Courtroom B 235
  • 14 - The Great Recovered Memory Debate 256
  • 15 - The Power of Suggestion 270
  • 16 - Holly's Day in Court 290
  • 17 - The T-Graph 317
  • 18 - The Debate Continues 333
  • 19 - Verdict 351
  • Epilogue the Impact 379
  • The Process 401
  • Notes 404
  • Selected Bibliography 428
  • Acknowledgments 434
  • Index 436
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