Harlem Renaissance Re-Examined

By Victor A. Kramer; Robert A. Russ | Go to book overview

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

The subsidiary paperback rights for this book have been granted by AMS Press, Inc. This completely revised edition is an expansion of The Harlem Renaissance Re-examined, Vol. 2 of the Georgia State Literary Studies Series. The revised and expanded version has been completely re-set and includes two new essays, a portfolio of photographs, and a chronology as well as a completely revised and updated bibliography.

For the permission to reprint the photographs of Cullen, Du Bois, Hughes, Hurston, Waters, and West, thanks is extended to the Estate of Carl Van Vechten, Joseph Solomon, Executor. Edward Steichen's photograph of Robeson is reprinted courtesy of Joanna Steichen. Further thanks for the photographs reprinted in this volume goes to Regina Andrews, Griffith J. Davis, and the Harold Jackman Countee Cullen Memorial Collection at Atlanta University.

Blues, a 1929 oil by Archibald Motley, Jr., was executed in Paris while he was there on a Guggenheim Memorial Foundation Fellowship. Born in New Orleans in 1891 and a virtual lifelong resident of Chicago, Motley has been termed America's first urban black painter. (Photograph courtesy of Archie Motley.)

The assistance of the English Department of Georgia State University; the expertise of Leigh Kirkland, who saw the book through its preparation as a camera-ready project; and the work done by several graduate students including Michael Newman, David Remy, and, especially, Petra Dreiser, is greatly appreciated. The new contributions by colleagues Carolyn C. Denard and Jane Kuenz have added to the usefulness of this edition.

The co-editor, Robert A. Russ, who did the bibliography for the first edition combed the original volume during the revision and proved to be invaluable as this second project unfolded.

-v-

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