Harlem Renaissance Re-Examined

By Victor A. Kramer; Robert A. Russ | Go to book overview
Save to active project

INTRODUCTION TO NEW EDITION

VICTOR A. KRAMER

In 1938, when much we now call the Harlem Renaissance was overshadowed, even forgotten, because of the Great Depression, Zora Neale Hurston published a book dedicated to Carl Van Vechten, whom she called "God's Image of a Teacher." Her gracious gesture reminds us of how we learn and is a reminder of what was frequently sensed about the complexity of the Harlem Renaissance, a cultural blend now being intensely investigated by scholars of both races. Like any complex cultural movement in which persons learn from each other, the Harlem Renaissance (and its continuing study) must be seen as a series of interrelated events which reverberate down into our present consciousness. It is for such reasons that we return to this project with this expanded paperback edition.

Scholars know the surprising story of Zora Neale Hurston, long neglected and now being re-evaluated. We sometimes forget that the continuing process of re-examination is furthered because of the energetic intellectual and artistic curiosity of people like Hurston and Van Vechten and all the other artists examined in this book. As is clear from the figures examined here, as well as from the photographs added to this edition, which provide hints of the interplay between and among artists and black and white awareness, the phenomenon called the Harlem Renaissance will continue to spark the imagination of students and scholars.

It is especially appropriate as this book goes to press to mention the late Charles T. Davis, whose encouragement stood behind much of this continuing project. His 1970 University of Iowa N.E.H. Summer Institute on the Harlem Renaissance, which I attended, was a stimulus to the 1974 Studies in the Literary Imagination issue, which led to this revised study. A recent article about

-1-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
Loading One moment ...
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Harlem Renaissance Re-Examined
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

While we understand printed pages are helpful to our users, this limitation is necessary to help protect our publishers' copyrighted material and prevent its unlawful distribution. We are sorry for any inconvenience.
Full screen
/ 422

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.

Are you sure you want to delete this highlight?