Harlem Renaissance Re-Examined

By Victor A. Kramer; Robert A. Russ | Go to book overview

JEAN TOOMER AND THE SOUTH:
REGION AND RACE AS ELEMENTS
WITHIN A LITERARY IMAGINATION

CHARLES T. DAVIS

If we are to take the word and trust the memories of those who participated in the Negro Renaissance in the 1920s, the most exciting single work produced by the movement was Cane, by Jean Toomer. 1 Cane appeared in 1923, 2 the work of an author not entirely unknown. Portions of Cane had appeared in The Crisis and in an impressive number of little magazines known for their commitment to revolutionary ideas and experimental writing. The list reads like the index of the study by Hoffman, Allen, and Ulrich, The Little Magazine: Broom, Double Dealer, Liberator, Little Review, Nomad, Prairie and S4N. It suggests that Toomer was a part of a lively intellectual world that considered with great seriousness the cultural situation of America at the time. 3 And it suggests too that the publication of Cane was an event of national consequence, not a local or provincial phenomenon or simply a racial one, the case, indeed, if Toomer's achievement were simply the satisfaction of being another Negro who had managed to publish a book. After all, just a year before, T. S. Eliot had published The Waste Land in another of these little magazines, The Dial, and we have just barely recovered from that event. Toomer arrived with a bang, and with a set of qualifications that could hardly be more impressive.

Though Toomer's achievement is not limited, finally, by reference to either region or race, it exploits in an unusual way both of these elements. Technically, Toomer was not a Southerner. Or to put it better, his connection with the South was not direct; it resembles Frost's association with New England. Robert Lee Frost was born in San Francisco, of parents originally from New England; Nathan Eugene Toomer, later called Jean, whose parents were originally from the South,

-215-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Harlem Renaissance Re-Examined
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 422

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.