The Decline of the Soviet Union and the Transformation of the Middle East

By David H. Goldberg; Paul Marantz | Go to book overview

can be forged into new separatist movements." 32 Ethnic grievances--of cultural threat, economic discrimination, and the like--feed a demand for revolutionary political change. Rejecting the values of the dominant group, independence-seekers spurn assimilation to the controlling group (in the Soviet case, the Russians) and instead re-adopt traditional ways. Once the independence idea has taken hold, negotiation to downgrade it becomes difficult if not impossible, because nationalists seek spiritual satisfaction and self-pride as much as the pursuit of material or political interests. The genie of self-determination can be squeezed back into the bottle only by the ethnic group itself.

Weighing, too, against the C.I.S. is the political immaturity of its members. Central Asian states are still ruled by one-party regimes. Even in Russia, democracy is in its infancy. (The Supreme Soviet, meeting in December 1992, conducted many ballots in secret, ruling out the possibility of deputies being accountable to the electors for their actions.) 33 Any agreement to join a federation is no more solid than the paper it is written on, since this association would be undertaken without popular consent. In Ukraine, a republic with opposition groups, the push is for independence rather than reintegration. The Soviet successor states' allegiance to a federation will be secure only when their own political systems are anchored in popular consent.

The Commonwealth of Independent States has been and will continue to be a feeble international entity, and a successor to it--in the form of a smaller association of Russian, Belarus and the Central Asian states--would also be frail. With luck, the C.I.S. will join the ranks of modest regional international organizations like the Organization of African Unity and the Organization of American States; at present, the European Economic Community example is unattainable. For young states in the process of self-definition, regional integration is not in the cards.


Notes
1.
Allan L. Kagedan, "Soviet Territorial Units as National Policy," in Henry R. Huttenbach , ed., Soviet Nationality Policies: Ruling Ethnic Groups in the U.S.S.R. ( London: Mansell, 1990), pp. 163-66.
2.
Dvenadtsatyi s'ezd RKP [b], April 17-25, 1913, Stenograficheskii otschet ( Moscow: Izdatel'stvo Politicheskoi Literatury, 1968), pp. 447-449.
3.
James E. Mace, Communism and the Dilemmas of National Liberation ( Cambridge, Mass.: Harvard University Press, 1983), pp. 86-119.
4.
Mark R. Elliot, "Soviet Military Collaborators During World War II," in Yury Boshyk , ed., Ukraine During World War II: History and Its Aftermath ( Edmonton: Canadian Institute of Ukrainian Studies, 1986), pp. 89-104.
5.
Yaroslav Bilinsky, "The Soviet Education Laws of 1958-9 and Soviet Nationality Policy," Soviet Studies, XIV ( October 1962), pp. 138-157.

-132-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Decline of the Soviet Union and the Transformation of the Middle East
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 240

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.