Historical Sketches of Statesmen Who Flourished in the Time of George III - Vol. 1

By Lord Henry Brougham | Go to book overview

MR. DUNDAS.

IF we turn from those whose common principles and party connexion ranged them against Mr. Pitt, to the only effectual supporter whom he could rely upon as a colleague on the Treasury Bench, we shall certainly find ourselves contemplating a personage of very inferior pretensions, although one whose powers were of the most useful description. Mr. Dundas, afterwards Lord Melville, had no claim whatever to those higher places among the orators of his age, which were naturally filled by the great men whom we have been describing; nor indeed could he be deemed inter oratorum numerum at all. He was a plain, business-like speaker; a man of every-day talents in the House; a clear, easy, fluent, and, from much practice, as well as strong and natural sense, a skilful debater; successful in profiting by an adversary's mistakes; distinct in opening a plan and defending a Ministerial proposition; capable of producing even a great effect upon his not unwilling audience by his broad and coarse appeals to popular prejudices, and his confident statements of fact -- those statements which Sir Francis Burdett once happily observed, "men fall into through an inveterate habit of official assertion." In his various offices no one was more useful. He was an admirable man of business; and those professional habits which he had brought from the bar (where he practised long enough for a youth of his fortunate family to reach the highest official place) were

-227-

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Historical Sketches of Statesmen Who Flourished in the Time of George III - Vol. 1
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • States Men of the Times of George Iii. 1
  • George Iii. 5
  • Lord Chatham. 17
  • Lord North. 48
  • Lord Loughborough. 70
  • Lord Thurlow. 88
  • Lord Chief Justice Gibbs. 124
  • Mr. Burke. 142
  • Mr. Fox. 178
  • Mr. Sheridan. 210
  • Mr. Windham. 219
  • Mr. Dundas. 227
  • Mr. Erskine. 236
  • Mr. Perceval. 246
  • Lord Grenville. 254
  • Mr. Grattan. 260
  • Sir Samuel Romilly. 290
  • Franklin 314
  • Fredkric Ii. 320
  • Gustavus Iii. 346
  • The Emperor Joseph. 359
  • Appendix. 387
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