The American States during and after the Revolution, 1775-1789

By Allan Nevins | Go to book overview

TABLE OF CONTENTS
CHAPTER I THE COLONIES BEFORE THEIR UNION
PAGE
An evolution rather than revolution1
Four types of colonial polity2
The governments of New England3-6
Faults of proprietary government6-9
The seven royal provinces9, 10
Inequitable representation at the South11
Struggle of frontier and lowlands11, 12
True social democracy rare12, 13
Modern Political methods develop13, 14
CHAPTER II BEGINNINGS OF THE TRANSITION FROM COLONIES TO STATES
Gap between radicals and conservatives15, 16
Typical grievances of the colonies16
Four disputes in North Carolina17-24
Two ideas in fundamental conflict25, 26
Rôle of the legislatures in the Revolution26
Virginia Burg take the lead27, 28
Virginia's Provincial Convention born28, 29
Beginnings of the Revolution in Massachusetts29, 30
The Massachusetts towns organize31, 32
The legislature goes as far as it dares32-35
A Provincial Convention organized36-38
New Hampshire takes similar action39
The Port Bill electrifies America39, 40
Provincial Conventions meet in Pennsylvania, Maryland, North Carolina40-42
South Carolina proves conservative42, 43
New Jersey holds a convention44, 45
Regular legislatures act in Connecticut, Rhode Island, Delaware45-47
New York and Georgia laggard47-50
Popular agitation in New York50-57
Gradual growth of patriot sentiment58-60
Crudity of most early Provincial Congress60-62

-xi-

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