The American States during and after the Revolution, 1775-1789

By Allan Nevins | Go to book overview

CHAPTER THREE THE EMERGENCE OF POPULAR GOVERNMENT

The repercussion of Lexington throughout America sent half of the royal governors scurrying for safety. The debonair and once popular John Wentworth of New Hampshire, for all his intrepidity, was one of the first to go. Though after Lexington 1200 New Hampshire men at once set out to join the forces about Boston, Wentworth for a time still hoped and labored for peace. Following the receipt of Lord North's conciliatory proposal, he had called a new Assembly which, containing the Colony's leading men, met May 4, 1775. Unfortunately for the Governor, the House not only returned an unfavorable reply to Lord North's offer, but it evinced a warm resentment of Wentworth's attempt to give three new towns the right of representation by the King's writ, as a special gubernatorial authorization was called.1 The House had always resisted efforts to interfere with its exclusive power to control representation, though Governor Benning Wentworth had beaten it upon this question about 1750, and now it emphatically bade the three claimants begone. Meanwhile signs of increasing violence had appeared. At the end of May there had been mild rioting in Portsmouth over the seizure of two provision ships by a British frigate, and many conservatives--such men as Benjamin Thompson, later Count Rumford --were being driven from the rural districts. On June 13 one of the royalists whom Wentworth had tried to assist to a seat in the Assembly was espied calling at the Governor's fine house, and a mob besieged the mansion, threatening to batter it down with a cannon. The crowd dispersed when the loyalist was given up, but the episode showed Wentworth how much danger he ran, and he withdrew to Fort William and Mary, where he was safe under the guns of a British warship.2

____________________
1
N. H. Prov. Papers VII, 370, 383 ff; Stackpole, II, 77 ff.
2
On July 18, 1775, he adjourned the House to September 28, and it never met again. N. H. Prov. Papers, VII, 385-86. Wentworth joined Howe in Boston went to New York, and after giving up hope of an invasion of New Hampshire, sailed to England in 1778. Mayo "John Wentworth,"163 ff.

-75-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The American States during and after the Revolution, 1775-1789
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 734

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.