The American States during and after the Revolution, 1775-1789

By Allan Nevins | Go to book overview

CHAPTER TWELVE STATE QUARRELS AND STATE FRIENDSHTPS

WHEN the Revolution ended, the States were united, in Washington's words, by a rope of sand. Not only were the Articles of Confederation a makeshift plan of union, but the very spirit of union seemed wanting. The States had fought beside each other without any notable disharmony. But they were far from being a closely- bound, affectionate family, and in the first years of peace they were to exhibit much petty jealousy and not a little actual quarrelsomeness. Each State and section had its own interests; their political and economic differences seemed to be growing; and in 1783 the general feeling was that any hope of close union was rather sentimental than practical. The drafting of even the weak Articles of Confederation was, as Congress declared, "attended by uncommon embarrassments and delay." It stated that "to form a permanent union, accommodated to the opinions and wishes of so many States, differing in habits, produce, commerce, and internal police, was found to be a task which nothing but time and reflection, conspiring with a disposition to conciliate, could mature and produce."

There were certain general rather than particular factors making against a firm union--the memory of colonial quarrels, the sectional prejudices which have some existence in nearly all countries at nearly all times, and the influence of a political philosophy which did not believe that large confederations were practicable. The first was by no means unimportant. Till a few years before the Revolution, no real sense of American nationality existed among the colonists. They often called themselves Englishmen or British subjects; they were Carolinians, Pennsylvanians, or New Englanders; but they felt little need for a term applicable to all the colonists, and the colonists alone. The New Englanders regarded themselves as a fairly homogenous, united body, Rhode Island alone falling outside the sisterhood. A more tenuous bond of sectional feeling was man

-544-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The American States during and after the Revolution, 1775-1789
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 734

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.