Master of Airpower: General Carl A. Spaatz

By David R. Mets | Go to book overview

Chapter III
PURSUIT AIRCRAFT AND MILITARY AVIATION

The decade of the twenties was an important one in the education of Maj. Carl Spaatz. At Issoudun he had struggled with the problems of an air commander in an era where money was plentiful but time was short. During this decade, as commander of the 1st Pursuit Group, he was to encounter the same set of problems, but now time was plentiful and money short. Spaatz continued his airpower education as one of Billy Mitchell's pupils and began to learn the ways of Washington. His four years in the capital on the air staff of Gen. Mason Patrick and Gen. James Fechet gave him insights into the styles of bureaucracies, into the high-level organizations of national security, and into ideas about how airpower might be used in campaigns independent of the Army and Navy. Meanwhile, he continually gave fate its chance by repeated tests of his skill and luck as an aviator in a time when flying was still in its infancy.

While Tooey was in France, Ruth had not returned to college, but rather had indulged her fascination for the theater. Moving to New York, she had a brief association with the professional theater. She joined a troupe to put on shows for the soldiers and sailors, an experience she claimed was delightful for the performers, though perhaps not for the soldiers. Sometime during that summer of 1918, she received a letter from Tooey saying he would soon be home. He could not say when or for what reason, because of censorship, but Ruth went to Washington

-39-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Master of Airpower: General Carl A. Spaatz
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 434

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.