Master of Airpower: General Carl A. Spaatz

By David R. Mets | Go to book overview
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Chapter V
GOING TO WAR

When the Spaatzes left Langley and moved to Washington in January 1939, they moved into an old house in Georgetown with a view towards buying and remodeling it. That plan did not work out because the place was part of an estate tied up in litigation, but they were happy there for a couple of years.

Their oldest daughter, Katharine ("Tattie"), was planning to go to Europe that summer to begin a year of study at the Sorbonne, in Paris, France. She was on the point of leaving when her father came home for lunch one day--an unusual thing for him. Although he seldom put his foot down about anything with his girls, he forbade Tattie to make the trip on the grounds that he felt war was imminent in Europe. Tattie's professor at Sweet Briar scoffed at Spaatz's notion, but Spaatz was adamant and refused to let her go. The second daughter, Rebecca, was attending a private school in Norfolk, Virginia, and she had remained behind to finish the school year. Already she was showing her bent for music, and the following year, she entered the Peabody Conservatory in Baltimore, Maryland. The youngest, Carla, was only seven and attended Mrs. Cook's School on Massachusetts Avenue, Washington, D.C. (now the Sheridan School). 1

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