Race and Ethnicity: Essays in Comparative Sociology

By Pierre L. Van den Berghe | Go to book overview

The "prediction" essay shows that nonwhites tend to be more radical than whites in their forecasts, but the discrepancy is not nearly as great as on the "solution" question. Whites and nonwhites largely agree in expecting great change, but tend to disagree in their willingness to accept change. Most whites expect more change than they are prepared to accept. Among nonwhites, some anticipate less change than they hope for, though the majority expect their desire for equality to be realized. Only 12.8 per cent of the Europeans and 8.4 per cent of the nonwhites expect the status quo to last for another twenty years, whereas 15.2 per cent and 23.5 per cent respectively anticipate a black government to the exclusion of whites or of all non-Africans.

Whites and nonwhites share a nearly equal pessimism about the way change will come: 54.4 per cent of the Europeans and 58.0 per cent of the non-Europeans say that they expect large- scale violence and bloodshed. Men tend to anticipate violence more than women. While this finding is undoubtedly colored by the police shootings a few weeks previous to answering the questionnaire, such pessimism is probably realistic.

Whites and nonwhites are likewise in agreement in their assessment of the past: 81.0 per cent of the sample say that the racial situation has deteriorated in the last twenty years, and only 6.7 per cent say that it has improved. The whites who say things have improved mostly mention a rise in living standards, while the nonwhites base their optimism on the hope that the extreme reactionary policies of the Nationalist government will precipitate the struggle for liberation.


Summary

A questionnaire study was conducted on a sample of 383 urban middle-class students in Durban. One of the most striking, if not unexpected, findings is the great difference in the attitudes of European as opposed to non-European respondents. Racialism and prejudice, though not absent among Africans and Indians, is strongest among Europeans.

Social distance increases with the subject's position in the South

-206-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Race and Ethnicity: Essays in Comparative Sociology
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 314

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.