Fourteenth Century Verse & Prose

By Kenneth Sisam | Go to book overview

Peté, the Drede of God. Begynne we at Consaile, for þareof
es myster at the begynnynge of oure werkes, þat vs myslyke
noghte aftyrwarde. With thire seuene gyftes þe Haly Gaste

teches sere mene serely. 60

Consaile es doynge awaye of worldes reches, and of all delytes of all thyngeʒ þat mane may be tagyld with, in thoghte
or dede, and þarwith drawynge intill contemplacyone of
Gode.

Undyrstandynge es to knawe whate es to doo, and whate 65
es to lefe, and þat that sall be gyffene, to gyffe it to thaym
þat has nede, noghte till oþer þat has na myster.
Wysedome es forgetynge of erthely thynges and thynkvnge
of heuen, with discrecyone of all mens dedys. In þis gyfte
schynes contemplacyone, þat es, Saynt Austyne says, a gastely 70
dede of fieschely affeccyones, thurghe þe ioye of a raysede
thoghte.

Strenghe es lastynge to fullfill gude purpose, þat it be
noghte lefte, for wele ne for waa.

Peté es þat a man be mylde, and gaynesay noghte Haly 75
Writte whene it smyttes his synnys, whethire he vndyrstand
it or noghte; bot in all his myghte purge he þe vilté of syne
in hyme and oþer.

Connynge es þat makes a man of gude 〈hope〉, noghte

ruysand hyme of his reghtewysnes, bot sorowand of his 80
synnys, and þat man gedyrs erthely gude anely to the
honour of God, and prow to oþer mene þane hymselfe.

The Drede of God es þat we turne noghte agayne till oure
syne thurghe any ill eggyng. And þan es drede perfite in vs

and gastely, when we drede to wrethe God in þe leste syne 85
þat we kane knawe, and flese it als venyme.

____________________
60 teches] towches Cambridge MS. DD. 5. 64.
63 þar] þat MS. Thornton.
69 mens] so Cambridge MS. DD. 5.
64 = mene MS. Thornton.
79 hope] from Cambridge MS. DD. 5.
64: om. MS. Thornton.
84 þan] Cambridge MS. DD. 5.
64: þen MS. Arundel 507: þat MS. Thornton.

-43-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Fourteenth Century Verse & Prose
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 464

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.