The Flowers of Evil

By Charles Baudelaire; James McGowan | Go to book overview

A CHRONOLOGY OF
CHARLES BAUDELAIRE
1821 9 April: birth, in Paris, of Charles-Pierre Baudelaire, son
of Joseph-François Baudelaire (age 63, painter and
administrative officer in the Senate) and Caroline
Archenbaut-Dufaÿs (age 28).
1827 Death of Baudelaire's father.
1828 Baudelaire's mother marries Major Jacques Aupick.
1832 Aupick is stationed in Lyons, where Baudelaire attends
school.
1836 Aupick is transferred to Paris, where Baudelaire attends
Lycée Louis-le-Grand.
1839 Baudelaire is expelled from school for refusing to
surrender a note passed to him but is allowed to take his
Baccalauréat exam (which he passes).
1839-40 Bohemian existence in Paris with a circle of young
poets.
1841 Sent by his parents on a voyage to India designed to
remove him from his bohemian milieu, Baudelaire
disembarks in Mauritius and Réunion and, refusing to go
further, returns to Paris.
1842 On turning 21, Baudelaire inherits 100,000 francs from
his father, which would have given him a modest but
adequate income, similar to Gustave Flaubert's. Becomes
involved with Jeanne Duval, a mulatto actress with whom
he lives off and on for most of his life.
1842-4 Collaborates on various literary projects with his friends,
writes poetry, including some of the poems of The Flowers
of Evil
, and contracts substantial debts.
1844 Because Baudelaire has been spending his capital and
acquiring debts quickly, his family undertakes a judicial
procedure to have his money removed from his control
and placed in trust for him, under a 'conseil judiciaire'
or trustee ( Narcisse Ancelle, the family lawyer). This

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