The Bible in Spain, Or, the Journeys, Adventures, and Imprisonments of An Englishman: In An Attempt to Circulate the Scriptures in the Peninsula

By George Borrow | Go to book overview

"No, Señor, it is not all; for I was right in supposing them evil brujos: the very next day an express arrived and a great search was made after them, and I was arrested for having harboured them. This occurred just after the present wars had commenced. It was said they were spies and emissaries of I don't know what nation, and that they had been in all parts of the Asturias, holding conferences with some of the disaffected. They escaped, however, and were never heard of more, though the animals which they rode were found without their riders, wandering amongst the hills; they were common ponies, and were of no value. As for the brujos, it is believed that they embarked in some small vessel which was lying concealed in one of the rias of the coast."

Myself.--What was the word which you continually heard proceeding from the lips of the big servant, and which you think you can remember?

Host.--Señor, it is now three years since I heard it, and at times I can remember it and at others not; sometimes I have started up in my sleep repeating it. Stay, Señor, I have it now at the point of my tongue: it was Patusca.

Myself.--Batuschca, you mean; the men were Russians.


CHAPTER XXXIII.

Oviedo--The Ten Gentlemen--The Swiss Again--Modest Request--The Robbers--Episcopal Benevolence--The Cathedral--Portrait of Feijoo.

I MUST now take a considerable stride in my journey, no less than from Muros to Oviedo, contenting myself with observing, that we proceeded from Muros to Velez, and from thence to Giyon, where our guide Martin bade us farewell, and returned with his mare to Rivadeo. The honest fellow did not part without many expressions of regret, indeed he even expressed a desire that I should take him and his mare into my service; "For," said he, "I have a great desire to run through all Spain, and even the world; and I am sure I shall never have a better opportunity than by attaching myself to your worship's skirts." On my reminding him, however, of his wife and family, for he had both, he said, "True, true, I had forgotten them: happy the guide whose only wife and family are a mare and foal."

Oviedo is about three leagues from Giyon. Antonio rode the horse, whilst I proceeded thither in a kind of diligence which daily between the two towns. The road is good, but mountainous. I arrived safely at the capital of the Asturias, although at a rather unpropitious season, for the din of war was at the gate, and there was the cry of the captains and the shouting. Castile, at the time of which I am writing, was in the hands of the Carlists, who had captured and plundered Valladolid in much the same manner as they had Segovia

-238-

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The Bible in Spain, Or, the Journeys, Adventures, and Imprisonments of An Englishman: In An Attempt to Circulate the Scriptures in the Peninsula
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • The Minerva Library. ii
  • Title Page iii
  • Introduction. v
  • Preface. xi
  • Contents xvii
  • Chapter I 1
  • Chapter II 9
  • Chapter III 16
  • Chapter IV 24
  • Chapter V 30
  • Chapter VI 36
  • Chapter VII 41
  • Chapter VIII 47
  • Chapter IX 53
  • Chapter X 62
  • Chapter XI 74
  • Chapter XII 82
  • Chapter XIII 90
  • Chapter XIV 98
  • Chapter XV 105
  • Chapter XVI 113
  • Chapter XVII 120
  • Chapter XVIII 126
  • Chapter XX 135
  • Chapter XXI *
  • Chapter XXII 152
  • Chapter XXIII 160
  • Chapter XXIV 163
  • Chapter XXV 171
  • Chapter XXVI 178
  • Chapter XXVII 187
  • Chapter XXVIII 194
  • Chapter XXIX 203
  • Chapter XXX 212
  • Chapter XXXI 223
  • Chapter XXXII 231
  • Chapter XXXIII 238
  • Chapter XXXIV 244
  • Chapter XXXV 251
  • Chapter XXXVI 252
  • Chapter XXXVII 258
  • Chapter XXXVIII 263
  • Chapter XXXIX 266
  • Chapter XL 273
  • Chapter XLI 282
  • Chapter XLII 288
  • Chapter XLIII 296
  • Chapter XLIV 304
  • Chapter XLV 310
  • Chapter XLVI 313
  • Chapter XLVIII 326
  • Chapter XLIX 332
  • Chapter L 338
  • Chapter LI 346
  • Chapter LII 356
  • Chapter LIII 366
  • Chapter LIV 370
  • Chapter LV 376
  • Chapter LVI 382
  • Chapter LVII 389
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