The Bible in Spain, Or, the Journeys, Adventures, and Imprisonments of An Englishman: In An Attempt to Circulate the Scriptures in the Peninsula

By George Borrow | Go to book overview

Thereupon I presented him with a few dollars.

"A strange man is this Benedict," said Antonio to me next morning, as, accompanied by a guide, we sallied forth from Oviedo; "a strange man, mort maitre, is this same Benedict. A strange life has he led, and a strange death he will die,--it is written on his countenance. That he will leave Spain I do not believe, or if he leave it, it will be only to return, for he is bewitched about this treasure. Last night he sent for a sorcière, whom he consulted in my presence; and she told him that he was doomed to possess it, but that first of all he must cross water. She cautioned him likewise against an enemy, which he supposes must be the canon of St. James. I have often heard people speak of the avidity of the Swiss for money, and here is a proof of it. I would not undergo what Benedict has suffered in these last journeys of his, to possess all the treasures in Spain."


CHAPTER XXXIV.

Departure from Oviedo--Villa Viciosa--The Young Man of the Inn--Antonio's Tale--The General and his Family--Woful Tidings--To-morrow we die --San Vincente--Santander--An Harangue--Flinter the Irishman.

So we left Oviedo and directed our course towards Santander. The man who accompanied us as guide, and from whom I hired the pony on which I rode, had been recommended to me by my friend the merchant of Oviedo. He proved, however, a lazy indolent fellow; he was generally loitering two or three hundred yards in our rear, and instead of enlivening the way with song and tale, like our late guide, Martin of Rivadeo, he scarcely ever opened his lips, save to tell us not to go so fast, or that I should burst his pony if I spurred him so. He was thievish withal, and though he had engaged to make the journey seco, that is, to defray the charges of himself and beast, he contrived throughout to keep both at our expense. When journeying in Spain, it is invariably the cheapest plan to agree to maintain the guide and his horse or mule, for by so doing the hire is diminished at least one- third, and the bills upon the road are seldom increased; whereas, in the other case, he pockets the difference, and yet goes shot free, and at the expense of the traveller, through the connivance of the innkeepers, who have a kind of fellow-feeling with the guides.

Late in the afternoon we reached Villa Viciosa, a small dirty town, at the distance of eight leagues from Oviedo: it stands beside a creek, which communicates with the Bay of Biscay. It is sometimes called La Capitál de las Avellanas, or the capital of the Filberts, from the immense quantity of this fruit which is grown in the neighbourhood; and the greatest part of which is exported to England. As we drew nigh we overtook numerous cars laden with avellanas proceeding in the direction of the town. I was informed that several small English

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The Bible in Spain, Or, the Journeys, Adventures, and Imprisonments of An Englishman: In An Attempt to Circulate the Scriptures in the Peninsula
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • The Minerva Library. ii
  • Title Page iii
  • Introduction. v
  • Preface. xi
  • Contents xvii
  • Chapter I 1
  • Chapter II 9
  • Chapter III 16
  • Chapter IV 24
  • Chapter V 30
  • Chapter VI 36
  • Chapter VII 41
  • Chapter VIII 47
  • Chapter IX 53
  • Chapter X 62
  • Chapter XI 74
  • Chapter XII 82
  • Chapter XIII 90
  • Chapter XIV 98
  • Chapter XV 105
  • Chapter XVI 113
  • Chapter XVII 120
  • Chapter XVIII 126
  • Chapter XX 135
  • Chapter XXI *
  • Chapter XXII 152
  • Chapter XXIII 160
  • Chapter XXIV 163
  • Chapter XXV 171
  • Chapter XXVI 178
  • Chapter XXVII 187
  • Chapter XXVIII 194
  • Chapter XXIX 203
  • Chapter XXX 212
  • Chapter XXXI 223
  • Chapter XXXII 231
  • Chapter XXXIII 238
  • Chapter XXXIV 244
  • Chapter XXXV 251
  • Chapter XXXVI 252
  • Chapter XXXVII 258
  • Chapter XXXVIII 263
  • Chapter XXXIX 266
  • Chapter XL 273
  • Chapter XLI 282
  • Chapter XLII 288
  • Chapter XLIII 296
  • Chapter XLIV 304
  • Chapter XLV 310
  • Chapter XLVI 313
  • Chapter XLVIII 326
  • Chapter XLIX 332
  • Chapter L 338
  • Chapter LI 346
  • Chapter LII 356
  • Chapter LIII 366
  • Chapter LIV 370
  • Chapter LV 376
  • Chapter LVI 382
  • Chapter LVII 389
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