Alignment despite Antagonism: The United States-Korea-Japan Security Triangle

By Victor D. Cha | Go to book overview

SIX
The 1980s: Evolution and Friction
During the Reagan Years

IN THE 1980s Ronald Reagan assumed the presidency with a mandate to reestablish American global strength and stature. In Asia this "peace through strength" message translated into a reaffirmation of defense commitments to U.S. allies. Reagan's invitation to ROK President Chun Doo-hwan as one of his first official state guests in 1981 and his explicit assurances that U.S. combat forces would remain indefinitely in Korea were strong pronouncements of this policy. The message also rang clearly in Japan, where the administration's initiatives for a deepening strategic relationship with Japan, coupled with the development of a personal rapport between Reagan and Premier Nakasone Yasuhiro, engendered a new, intimate partnership that the Japanese had long desired. These actions reestablished U.S. credibility in the region and effectively supplanted fears of U.S. abandonment prevalent in Seoul and Tokyo during the Jimmy Carter years.

Concurrent with these developments Japan-ROK bilateral relations experienced a number of watershed events. In 1983 the two countries held summit talks for the first time in the history of normalized relations; in 1984 Emperor Hirohito offered a historic public apology for Japan's past aggression against Korea; and economic interdependence during the period was highlighted by the conclusion of an unprecedented $4-billion-loan agreement. These developments led many to herald the start of a new era of cooperation in bilateral relations.

The confluence of these two trends appears to pose an anomaly for the argument advanced by the quasi-alliance model, according to which decreased fears of U.S. abandonment in the 1980s should have given rise to contentious, not cooperative behavior between Japan and the ROK. This chapter addresses the 1980s in Japan-ROK relations in the

-169-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Alignment despite Antagonism: The United States-Korea-Japan Security Triangle
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Acknowledgments vii
  • Contents xi
  • Map and Figures xii
  • Tables xiii
  • A Note to the Reader xiv
  • Abbreviations xv
  • Introduction: the Puzzle and Its Importance 1
  • One - The Enigma of History 9
  • Two - The Argument: Quasi Alliances 36
  • Three - Cooperation Under the Nixon Doctrine, 1969-1971 59
  • Four - Detente and the Heightening Crisis, 1972-1974 100
  • Five - Vietnam and the Carter Years, 1975-1979 141
  • Six - The 1980s: Evolution and Friction During the Reagan Years 169
  • Conclusion: Quasi Allies or Adversaries in the Post -- Cold War Era? 199
  • Appendix 233
  • Reference Matter 241
  • Notes 243
  • Works Cited 335
  • Index 359
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 373

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.