Political Cleavages: Issues, Parties, and the Consolidation of Democracy

By Alejandro Moreno | Go to book overview

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

This book benefited from the continuous interaction of the author with several scholars and professionals. First, I would like to thank Ronald Inglehart. As my adviser in Michigan, he continuously insisted that I do comparative analysis beyond the limits I had set for myself. As a coordinator of the World Values Survey (WVS), he gave me the opportunity to work on the preparation of an amazing dataset that nowadays sets the standard for major comparative work. As a colleague, he encouraged the continuation of the WVS project in Latin America in general and in Mexico in particular. He was also very generous in providing newer data from the third wave of the WVS to update the analysis for the book. Thanks are also due to each of the principal investigators of the WVS around the world; this and many other books based on that valuable dataset would not be possible without their efforts. As a principal investigator of the WVS in Mexico, Miguel Basáñez invited me a decade ago to work with him on the project, thereby opening up for me the whole field of public opinion studies in Mexico. Peter H. Smith gave me the confidence and the opportunity to jump from graduate work to publication. He suggested the best way to prepare this book for the Latin America in Global Perspective series, which he edits at Westview Press. Karl Yambert, senior editor at Westview Press, was very kind and patient in the publication process, always giving me a sense of direction and timing. Nancy Burns, John Huber, and Vincent Price gave me very precious time in the early stages of this project and provided very insightful evaluations of its methodological, comparative, and theoretical implications. I also benefited enormously from comments by Chris Achen, Dan Levine, Roy Pierce, Michael Traugott, Warren Mitofsky, Roderic Camp, and Scott Mainwaring. I would like to thank the Instituto Tecnológico Autónomo de México (ITAM), in Mexico City, for its support. I am very grateful to my colleagues at ITAM, who have enriched and encouraged my scholarly work. Federico Estévez is a tireless reader, and I cannot think of a work of mine that has not benefited a priori or a posteriori from his insights. I also thank Beatriz Magaloni and Carlo Varela for their helpful comments and support. The Conselo Nacional de Ciencia y Tecnología (CONACYT) in Mexico City offered financial support during my doctoral studies and research. The data used in this book are archived at the Inter-University Consortium for Political and Social Research (ICPSR) of the Institute for Social Research (ISR) at the University of Michigan. Needless to say, although I deeply benefited from the support of all these individuals and institutions, I am alone responsible for the contents of the book and for the way I used and interpreted the data.

Last but not least, I want to thank my wife, Christine, and our children, Josh, Tiffany, and Alex, for the love, patience, and support they always give me. This book is dedicated to them.

-6-

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Political Cleavages: Issues, Parties, and the Consolidation of Democracy
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Tables and Figures ix
  • Acronyms xi
  • Introduction 1
  • Acknowledgments 6
  • Notes 7
  • Chapter One - Democracy, Democratization, and Political Cleavages 9
  • Conclusion 26
  • Notes 26
  • Chapter Two - Political Cleavages in Advanced Industrial Societies 28
  • Conclusion 72
  • Notes 73
  • Chapter Three - Political Cleavages in Post-Communist Societies 76
  • Conclusion 104
  • Notes 104
  • Chapter Four - Political Cleavages in Latin America 106
  • Conclusion 148
  • Notes 148
  • Chapter Five - Conclusion: A Cross-National Comparison of Cleavages 150
  • Conclusion 164
  • Appendix A: Surveys and Question Wording 167
  • Appendix B: A Brief Description of Discriminant Analysis 182
  • References 186
  • Index 193
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