Political Cleavages: Issues, Parties, and the Consolidation of Democracy

By Alejandro Moreno | Go to book overview

Age is the main influence in the second cleavage dimension of party constituencies. It appears that younger voters support both democratic and authoritarian parties as well as the economic left and right. The major parties have a centrist position on this dimension, suggesting that they draw support from all age groups. The parties that draw greater support from younger voters are Women of Russia, Dershava, and the Liberal-Democratic Party of Russia. Forward Russia and the Party of Self-Government draw support from older voters. The analysis shows the importance of generational differences in Russia, but these differences do not seem to be associated with a relevant ideological dimension of conflict. Thus the second cleavage dimension does not reveal a significant generational gap on policy.

In summary, the democratic-authoritarian dimension is a very important source of political cleavage in Russia. The main candidates in the 1996 presidential election were clear representatives of the opposing positions along this cleavage line. This cleavage has deepened as dissatisfaction with the new political and economic systems has increased among some segments of the electorate. Many Russians have expressed nostalgia for the Communist System ( White, Rose, and McAllister 1997).


CONCLUSION

This chapter presented an analysis of political cleavages in post-Communist societies. In some of those societies there is a strong cleavage defined by favorable and unfavorable views toward political and economic reform. Evidence of a democratic-authoritarian cleavage is particularly strong for Russia in the 1990s. In other countries, such as Hungary, Poland, Czechoslovakia, and Slovenia, the democratic-authoritarian divide is less central. In these countries, political competition centers on a liberal-fundamentalist line of conflict. The next chapter analyzes the extent to which these issue dimensions constitute relevant political cleavages in Latin America.


NOTES
1.
Question wording for the variables used in the analysis are given in Appendix A.
2.
The 1990-1993 wave of the World Values Survey was carried out before Czechoslovakia split into the Czech and Slovak Republics.
3.
The 1990 Russian sample was not included in the discriminant analysis because party preferences were not ascertained in the Russian questionnaire that year. A question about party preference or vote intention is central in the discriminant analysis, so in order to have an analysis of Russian voters I included the Greater Moscow sample. In 1995, the Russian survey did ask about party preference. The 1995 analysis is shown later in the chapter.
4.
In a previous analysis, I included region in the discriminant analysis for Czech and Slovak parties. Region was obviously too strong a variable simply because each

-104-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Political Cleavages: Issues, Parties, and the Consolidation of Democracy
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Tables and Figures ix
  • Acronyms xi
  • Introduction 1
  • Acknowledgments 6
  • Notes 7
  • Chapter One - Democracy, Democratization, and Political Cleavages 9
  • Conclusion 26
  • Notes 26
  • Chapter Two - Political Cleavages in Advanced Industrial Societies 28
  • Conclusion 72
  • Notes 73
  • Chapter Three - Political Cleavages in Post-Communist Societies 76
  • Conclusion 104
  • Notes 104
  • Chapter Four - Political Cleavages in Latin America 106
  • Conclusion 148
  • Notes 148
  • Chapter Five - Conclusion: A Cross-National Comparison of Cleavages 150
  • Conclusion 164
  • Appendix A: Surveys and Question Wording 167
  • Appendix B: A Brief Description of Discriminant Analysis 182
  • References 186
  • Index 193
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 212

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.