Bolivar the Liberator

By Michel Vaucaire; Margaret Reed | Go to book overview
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XXXII

WITH their arms full of provisions and of gifts, the inhabitants of the towns flocked to meet the Liberator.

Triumphal arches marked Bolivar's progress. People walked for leagues in order to touch his garments. The soldiers, who had forgotten the fatigues of their crossing of the Andes and who at last realized their leader's genius, were ready thenceforward for any trial that he chose to suggest to them.

Everywhere Bolivar spoke of the good relations between New Granada and Venezuela; the nations were brothers; the Venezuelans were doing no more than pay their debts, for President Torres on his side had not hesitated to attempt the deliverance of the province of Caracas. Out of the wealth abandoned by the Spaniards, the Liberator allotted pensions to all the victims of enemy atrocities and to the widows of his soldiers. Santander was appointed Vice-President of Bogotá.

Bolivar continued his victorious march, but the news which he received from Angostura compelled him to return to that town after having handed over his army to Anzoategui.

There was neither more nor less than conspiracy at Angostura. The Congress were disturbed by what they termed Bolivar's boundless ambition; they

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