Applications of Cognitive Psychology: Problem Solving, Education, and Computing

By Dale E. Berger; Kathy Pezdek et al. | Go to book overview

THE FUTURE OF WANDAH

We have just argued that one reason WANDAH may be effective is because it employs the methods that good teachers use. And, of course, there is probably a sizable novelty effect. But what about the future? Will the computer bring fundamental changes in the way we write and do research?

We conjecture as follows: We might be seeing in WANDAH the beginnings of a more generally useful problem-solving tool for writing and doing research-- a cognitive amplifier in the sense that the industrial age produced machines that amplified human physical abilities. The next generation, more intelligent SUPER-WANDAH will have a better knowledge of language and will be able to offer more accurate advice on style and grammar. She will have a variety of templates and outlines to prompt the user in organizing ideas. SUPER-WANDAH will also allow the user to interact through an intelligent, expert tutor with various data bases of knowledge. The user could thus take notes, try out different structures, search for relationships, and test hypotheses. The user will further be able to direct SUPER-WANDAH to synopsize or abstract relevant information.

This SUPER-WANDAH of the future would certainly do a better job of allowing us to deal with our cognitive load--the constraints on our organizing ideas and writing. But it just might also be a quantum leap in amplifying our problem-solving skills. This is the true promise of WANDAH. It is a research question for the future whether in such a SUPER-WANDAH the argument given earlier about the confusion of medium of communication and method of instruction is no longer valid. If so, then a SUPER-WANDAH, the medium becomes the method (or vice-versa).


ACKNOWLEDGMENT

WANDAH was developed at the University of California, Los Angeles, by the Word Processing Writing Project under a grant from the Exxon Education Foundation: Morton Friedman and Earl Rand, Principal Investigators; Ruth Von Blum, Project Director; Michael Cohen, Principal Programmer; Lisa Gerrard, Design Consultant; Andrew Magpantay and Susan Cheng, Assistant Programmers.


REFERENCES

Card, S., Moran, T., & Newell, A. ( 1983). The psychology of human-computer interaction. Hillsdale, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates.

Clark, R. ( 1983). Reconsidering research on learning from media. Review of Educational Research, 53, 445-459.

Greenfield, P. ( 1984). Mind and media. Cambridge, MA: Harvard.

-225-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Applications of Cognitive Psychology: Problem Solving, Education, and Computing
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Preface xi
  • I- a Range of Educational Applications 1
  • I- a Range of Educational Applications 3
  • Introduction 3
  • Conclusions 13
  • References 14
  • 2- Electronic Technologies, Education, and Cognitive Development 17
  • Conclusions- The Case for Multimedia Education 30
  • References 31
  • 3- Learning Programming Languages- Research and Applications 33
  • Introduction 33
  • Conclusion 43
  • Acknowledgments 44
  • References 44
  • 4- An Investigation of Groups Working at the Computer 47
  • Introduction 47
  • Summary 56
  • Conclusion 56
  • Conclusion 57
  • Conclusion 57
  • 5- Applying Cognitive- Developmental Theory to the Acquisition of Literacy 59
  • II- The Teaching of Thinking and Problem Solving 75
  • Abstract 75
  • Conclusions 84
  • Acknowledgments 85
  • References 85
  • 7- Developing Reasoning Skills in College Students 87
  • Acknowledgment 96
  • References 96
  • 8- Teaching Productive Problem- Solving Attitudes 99
  • Summary 106
  • References 107
  • 9- Learnable Aspects of Problem Solving- Some Examples 109
  • Introduction 109
  • Conclusion 120
  • References 120
  • 10- A Task Analysis of Algebra Word Problems 123
  • Introduction 123
  • Conclusions 135
  • Acknowledgments 136
  • References 136
  • III- Tradeoffs in the Design of Human-Computer Interfaces 139
  • 11- Design Principles for Human- Computer Interfaces 141
  • Abstract 141
  • Summary and Conclusions 160
  • Acknowledgments 161
  • References 161
  • 12- Some Tools for Redesigning System-Operator Interfaces 163
  • Acknowledgments 179
  • References 179
  • 13- Developing Computer Tools to Support Performing and Learning Complex Cognitive Skills 183
  • Introduction 183
  • Conclusions 199
  • Acknowledgments 199
  • 14- An Evaluation Model of Chinese Graphemic Input Systems 201
  • Acknowledgment 216
  • References 216
  • 15- Wandah--A Computerized Writer''s Aid 219
  • Acknowledgment 225
  • References 225
  • Author Index 227
  • Subject Index 232
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 242

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.