Daddy's Gone to War: The Second World War in the Lives of America's Children

By William M. Tuttle Jr. | Go to book overview

CHAPTER 6 Rearing Preschool Children

DURING THE Second World War, preschool teacher Claudia Lewis moved from New York City to eastern Tennessee. Lewis had been teaching three-, four-, and five-year-olds in a nursery school in Greenwich Village, but she wanted to broaden her perspective on childhood development by relocating to another part of the country. Arriving in Tennessee's Cumberland plateau, she soon discovered she had entered a world dramatically different from the one she had just left. The touchstone of that difference was the children themselves.

The children of the Cumberland were placid and shy. Much of the time they stayed by themselves, shunning the vigorous group play and spirited conversation so common among New York City children. Lewis had not gone to Tennessee to do research for a book, but when she "realized that there were marked differences between the mountain children and those... in Greenwich Village," she started "to look more closely at the structure of the community":

I wanted to find out what kind of homes and upbringing made these chil
dren so unresisting and "easy to handle."... Why was there so little rebel
lion in the mountains?... What was the meaning of their outwardly peace
ful, placid behavior? And why were these children so shy for months at a
time?... Was there any relation between the... talent of the New York
children and their energetic, self-assertive ways? Between the mediocre per
formances of the mountain children and their compliant, apparently untrou
bled behavior? 1

While Claudia Lewis did not discover the answers to all these questions, she did describe profound differences in the childhood circumstances as well as the child-rearing traditions of these two societies during the Second World War. What proved startling was that these stark differences existed in a nation whose population--with the monumental exception of people of color--was reportedly being rapidly assimilated in the American "melting pot."

-91-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Daddy's Gone to War: The Second World War in the Lives of America's Children
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 368

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.