Daddy's Gone to War: The Second World War in the Lives of America's Children

By William M. Tuttle Jr. | Go to book overview

NOTES ON SOURCES

The most valuable sources for this book are the letters written to me by more than 2500 homefront children. These letters, which document both the scope of the children's experiences and their intensity, are on deposit in the Kansas Collection, Spencer Research Library, University of Kansas, and can be used there by researchers.

Periodicals, both popular magazines such as Life and Newsweek and scores of specialfocus publications, were also essential sources. My research began with a thorough review of all pertinent articles listed in the Reader's Guide to Periodical Literature, the International Index to Periodicals, and other indexes. There were hundreds of articles on children's health, education, and recreation. Articles on America's wartime schools, for example, appeared in the Elementary School Journal, Journal of Educational Sociology, Journal of the National Education Association, The School Review, School and Society, and other journals. Filled with information on the homefront children's health were articles in the American Journal of Nursing, Hygeia, Journal of Pediatrics, Science Digest, and Science News Letter. Children's emotional health was an important subject in the American Journal of Orthopsychiatry and Mental Hygiene. In addition, many of America's leading magazines had experts giving advice on children's lives. Three of the best were Catherine Mackenzie of the New York Times Magazine, Clara Savage Littledale of Parents' Magazine, and Gladys Denny Shultz of Better Homes & Gardens; relevant articles about children's wartime concerns also appeared in American Home, Good Housekeeping, House & Garden, Ladies' Home Journal, and Woman's Home Companion. Last, children's own magazines were important, such as Boys' Life.

Government documents were invaluable in a variety of ways. Voluminous testimony about social conditions on the homefront was heard by committees of Congress; the most helpful of these hearings were:

U.S. House of Representatives, 76th and 77th Congs., Select Committee to Investigate the Interstate Migration of Destitute Citizens (later renamed Select Committee Investigating National Defense Migration). Hearings, Parts 1-34. Washington: GPO, 1940-1942.

U.S. House of Representatives, 77th Cong., 2nd Sess., through 79th Cong., 1st Sess., Subcommittee of the Committee on Appropriations. Department of Labor- Federal Security Agency Appropriation Bill for 1943 [and 1944, 1945, 1946]. Washington: GPO, 1942 [and 1943, 1944, 1945].

U.S. House of Representatives, 78th Cong., 1st Sess., Subcommittee of the Committee on Naval Affairs. Investigation of Congested Areas. Washington: GPO, 1943.

U.S. Senate, 78th Cong., 1st Sess., Committee on Education and Labor. Wartime Care and Protection of Children of Employed Mothers. Washington: GPO, 1943.

U.S. Senate, 78th Cong., 1st Sess., Subcommittee of the Committee on Education and Labor. Wartime Health and Education. Washington: GPO, 1943-44.

Too numerous to list are all the governmental publications that proved helpful, including the Congressional Record, the bulletins of the Women's Bureau and the Children's Bureau,

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