Economic Strategy and National Security: A Next Generation Approach

By Patrick J. DeSouza | Go to book overview

Acknowledgments

Approximately three short years ago, the Council on Foreign Relations (CFR) celebrated its seventy-fifth anniversary. Over the course of a remarkable century that, as Gary Hart notes in his essay, "has produced more history than it ever possibly could have consumed," the CFR has been a leading voice in trying to make sense of and to explain an interesting, sometimes tragic, but ever beautiful world. It has done so through a variety of communications vehicles such as Foreign Affairs, books, radio, television and, now, the Internet. In doing so, it has tried to help shape U.S. engagement in the world by blending an appreciation for the currents of history with "new realities" evident in economics, politics, military affairs, and technology.

The CFR's Annual Report for that anniversary year boldly kicked-off an effort to develop a somewhat untapped vein of insight regarding foreign policy: the ideas of the next generation. Various statements in the report communicated the CFR's deep commitment to the effort. Such leadership animated our efforts in the following pages.

Peter G. Peterson, in his chairman's letter, announced the establishment of a $2 million Next Generation Fund, which supported this project and many others.

Bob Hormats noted that, as one of the early participants in the CFR's Term Member Program--an effort to reach out to young men and women to participate in the grand foreign policy debate (and a program in which many in this volume have participated)--he was struck seeing the then stewards of U.S. foreign policy such as John McCloy, Averell Harriman, and George Kennan exchanging ideas with young members. We have had similar experiences with distinguished senior members such as Cyrus Vance and Henry Kissinger.

In his statement for the report, Hormats conveyed the "sense that [the] legacy [of these stewards] was the next generation's re

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