Economic Strategy and National Security: A Next Generation Approach

By Patrick J. DeSouza | Go to book overview

rity consciousness develops because of education than because of some catastrophic attack.


Conclusion

As it seems futile and self-defeating to attempt to stop either the flow of relatively open networks into U.S. systems or the international flow of IT that might make IW attacks against U.S. targets likely, the United States will need to go with those flows. At the same time, though, the United States will need to harden its systems and drive the development of international legal regimes so that they can cope with technological evolution. When discussing cyberspace it is easy to fall into the habit of calling things "new," "unique," or "revolutionary," (mostly because they often are) and assuming that old rules do not apply. Certainly IT can be "new," "unique," or "revolutionary," but in dealing with the new, unique, and revolutionary security threats that arise in a networked world, it is important to recognize that there is no singular solution to U.S. vulnerabilities. Just as the atom bomb gave the U.S. tremendous power, but then also posed a grave threat, the U.S. will have to adjust to the dangers that its technological talents bring it. In cyberspace, as in the old, physical world, there are no substitutes for vigilance, vigor, and ingenuity.


Notes
1.
U.S. Department of Commerce, The Emerging Digital Economy ( 1998), p. 4.
2.
Id., at A1-1.
3.
U. S. Department of the Air Force, Cornerstones of Information Warfare ( 1995), p. 2.
4.
These scenarios are based upon reported events and ideas suggested in a number of works, including: James Adams, The Next World War ( New York: Simon & Schuster) 1998, Roger C. Molander, Andrew S. Riddile, and Peter A. Wilson, Strategic Information Warfare: A New Face of War ( 1996), and Tom Clancy, Debt of Honor ( 1994).
5.
Adams, pp. 174-175.
6.
Tim Regan, "Wars of the future...today," The Christian Science Monitor ( June 24, 1999): 13.

-317-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Economic Strategy and National Security: A Next Generation Approach
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 404

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.