Economic Strategy and National Security: A Next Generation Approach

By Patrick J. DeSouza | Go to book overview
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Chapter 21
Conclusion

Patrick J. DeSouza and Laura Hills


Continuity and Change In U.S. Foreign Policy

In the essays and discussions that contributed to this volume, one question kept cropping up: Were the economic, political, and technological changes that we were discussing really new, catapulting us into unfamiliar territory? Or, were such changes simply old wine in new bottles? Put differently, in terms that Dave McCurdy and Gary Hart have outlined, do we need to make a break with the past to address effectively the "new realities" brought on by technology and globalization?

Part of the answer depends on what level of generality one is considering. First, at the level of the individual, in thinking about human nature, the fundamentals regarding the need for power and control over one's environment remain, as always, a "basic instinct." However, there is a unique aspect in that, as never before, new technologies will empower individuals to carry out their desires for good or evil.

For example, within the next decade, significant numbers of individuals will be able to choose their own "virtual" communities untethered to territory. In some regards, such choices will be to the good of society. Empowerment through new technologies will make one proud to be part of the twenty-first century. As illustrated during President Clinton's trip to the Mangueira school in

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