Liability: The Legal Revolution and Its Consequences

By Peter W. Huber | Go to book overview

4
Knowledge of the Law
Is No Excuse

A PIPER CHEROKEE airplane took off from an airport in Eugene, Oregon, with a student at the controls and Terry Littschwager, a qualified instructor, as copilot. Douglas Wilson and Arbie MacDonald were passengers. The plane crashed in the Cascade Mountains, and everyone but Littschwager died.

Surviving spouses Donna Wilson and Beverly MacDonald sued the Piper Aircraft Corporation, claiming defective design of the plane. Its engine had failed, they argued, because ice had formed in the carburetor. A better designed engine would have used a fuel injector instead. Piper pointed out that its plane's design had been fully approved by the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA); over 80 percent of planes of similar size also used carburetors rather than fuel injectors. A jury nevertheless returned large verdicts for the plaintiffs.

The Oregon Supreme Court reviewed the case and issued a lengthy opinion. The court conceded, at the outset, "special problems in the nature, and necessary proof, of a 'defect' in a product which reaches the consumer in precisely the condition intended by the designer/manufacturer." The

-45-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Liability: The Legal Revolution and Its Consequences
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Preface ix
  • Acknowledgments x
  • 1 - Uncommon Law 3
  • 2 - The Death of Contract 19
  • 3 - Search for New Rules 33
  • 4 - Knowledge of the Law is No Excuse 45
  • 5 - The New Town Meeting 62
  • 6 - Resetting the Clock 84
  • 7 - Sentence Without Verdict 98
  • 8 - Pain and Punishment 115
  • 9 - Insurance in Retreat 133
  • 10 - What is Deterred? 153
  • 11 - Rights in Collision 172
  • 12 - Compassion by Consent 190
  • 13 - Choosing Safety 207
  • 14 - Consent and Coercion 220
  • Notes 233
  • Index 253
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 262

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.