Visions of Order: The Cultural Crisis of Our Time

By Richard M. Weaver | Go to book overview

FOREWORD

ACCORDING to Gregory the Great, it has not pleased Go to save men through logic. Richard Weaver would have assented to this, knowing as he did the nature of the average sensual man and the limits of pure rationality. Yet with a high logical power, Weaver undertook an intellectual defense of culture, and of order and justice and freedom. This book, published a year after Weaver's death, is the last in a series of three strong, slim volumes: Ideas Have Consequences, The Ethics of Rhetoric, and Visions of Order. They are united by Weaver's appeal to right reason on behalf of the great traditions of humanity.

Dying before his time, at the age of fifty-three, Richard Weaver had lived austerely and seriously all his days. A shy little bulldog of a man from the mountains of North Carolina, as a graduate student at Vanderbilt University he came to know the ideas of the Southern agrarians, by whom he was powerfully influenced ever after. In the College of the University of Chicago he labored for nearly two decades, at odds with the kind of intellectuality prevalent there and nearly everywhere else in modern America.

-vii-

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Visions of Order: The Cultural Crisis of Our Time
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page i
  • Contents v
  • Foreword vii
  • Preface xi
  • Endnotes xvii
  • One - The Image of Culture 3
  • Two - Status and Function 22
  • Three - The Attack Upon Memory 40
  • Four - The Cultural Role of Rhetoric 55
  • Five - Forms and Social Cruelty 73
  • Six - A Dialectic on Total War 92
  • Seven - Gnostics of Education 113
  • Eight - The Reconsideration of Man 134
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