The Art of Joseph Conrad: A Critical Symposium

By R. W. Stallman | Go to book overview

breathing fire and smoke out of my nostrils. I am not a woman-devouring monster. I am not even what is technically called "a brute". I hope there's enough of a kid and an imbecile in me to answer the requirements of some really good woman eventually--some day . . . Some day.

But there is no irony directed against him. There can be no doubt that his comments are supposed to have our approval. Yet they are not ones which can lay bare any profound moral or psychological or spiritual issues; they exist rather to cast a haze of romance and mystery over certain aspects of his theme.

The sea and the sea-captain, too, are continually looked at through this mist of rhetoric. The two are linked:

It's true the sea is an uncertain element, but no sailor remembers this in the presence of its bewitching power any more than a lover ever thinks of the proverbial inconstancy of women . . . the captain of a ship at sea is a remote, inaccessible creature, something like a prince of a fairy-tale, alone of his kind . . .

Conrad reflects, on the link established between Marlow and Powell,

. . . the service of the sea and the service of a temple are both detached from the vanities and errors of a world which follows no severe rule.

We remember the irony of the narrator's reflections in "The Secret Sharer" on the simplicity of life at sea, or the voyage of Nostromo and Decoud in the lighter, or even such passages from The Mirror of the Sea: ". . . the sea that plays with men till their hearts are broken, and wears stout ships to death". But here, once the intruder--"Mr. Smith"-- who hates the sea is removed, then indeed "The sea was there to give them the shelter of its solitude free from the earth's petty suggestions".

More and more, as Conrad goes on writing, shall we find rhetoric used to make us accept valuations and judgments which have not been as deeply considered as those of his best early work, and already in Chance the process is far developed.4 We find it--even down to a care for sentence inversion--in such a passage as:

Captain Anthony had not moved away from the taffrail. He remained in the very position he took up to watch the other ship go by rolling and swinging all shadowy in the uproar of the following seas. He stirred not; and Powell keeping near-by did not dare speak to him, so enigmatical in its contemplation of the night did his figure appear to his young eyes: indistinct--and its immobility staring into gloom, the prey of some incomprehensible grief, longing or regret. ( 1952)


NOTES
1.
Hewitt sees "The Secret Sharer" as marking the end of one phase of Conrad's works; finding the presence of a crisis within the works of this period, tensions removed from the later works. In the later works there is no longer the emphasis on the sense of guilt, and his central figures tend more and more

-313-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Art of Joseph Conrad: A Critical Symposium
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 354

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.