San Francisco's Literary Frontier

By Franklin Dickerson Walker | Go to book overview

CHAPTER XIII
EPILOGUE

Up to the coming of the railroad San Francisco held an undisputed economic monopoly over the entire Pacific Coast: it was the port through which entered practically all the shipping from the Orient and from the Atlantic seaboard; it had much the largest population and the greatest wealth of any city in the West; and it contained the most important mercantile houses, banks, hotels, and theaters. It is hardly too great an exaggeration to say that San Francisco was the west coast. Then the railroad came, and with it the realization that not only San Francisco but hundreds of towns in the West would have direct communication with the East. The monopoly of trade by sea had been broken. And to make the situation darker, the importance of the city's excellent port received another blow: the Suez Canal, opened the year of the completion of the railroad, put an immediate end to San Francisco's dream of handling the bulk of Europe's trade with the Orient. The following year, the first year of the "Terrible Seventies," San Francisco felt in full force the depression which was not to hit the rest of the United States for three more years. Her golden era of commerce was

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San Francisco's Literary Frontier
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Good Books About the Pacific Coast *
  • Title Page i
  • Contents ix
  • Chapter I A Precocious Frontier 3
  • Chapter II The Fifties 17
  • Chapter III ɣ Apprentice Days 55
  • Chapter IV Washoe Silver and the Civil War 89
  • Chapter V The Golden Era 116
  • Chapter VI U+263 Visitors 146
  • Chapter VII Polite Literature and Ghosts 176
  • Chapter VIII A Rash of Poetry 207
  • Chapter IX The Town Crier 237
  • Chapter X The Overland Monthly 256
  • Chapter XI - Practical Literature 284
  • Chapter XII From Gold Gulch to Parnassus 316
  • Chapter XIII Epilogue 351
  • Bibliography 363
  • Notes and References 371
  • Index i
  • A Note on the Type In Which This Book is Set *
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