George Holmes Howison, Philosopher and Teacher: A Selection from His Writings, with a Biographical Sketch

By John Buckham Wright ; George Malcolm Stratton et al. | Go to book overview

HUMAN IMMORTALITY: ITS POSITIVE ARGUMENT
WITH REFERENCE TO THE INGERSOLL LECTURE OF PROFESSOR JAMES

IN OFFERING SOME WORDS on the great question of human immortality, I enjoy the advantage of the interest awakened by the essay of my brilliant friend from Harvard, read a few months ago to this Club.* The memory of that noble evening lives with you, I doubt not, still undimmed, and long will live, as it lives and long will live with me. The thoughts then stirred within you, I can count upon as having waked many another of those questions which haunt us concerning the mystery of life; and I may feel assured of your sympathy when I now attempt to renew their current.

I may assume, I judge, that some of you not only felt regarding immortality the difficulties which our guest addressed himself to obviating, but were also conscious of a certain feeling of insufficiency left by the method he took to relieve them. Probably, too, many of you wished, as I did, that we might be supplied in some way with something more positive, something more satisfyingly affirmative, than the mere opening of a chance to pull ourselves together and seize upon immortal life by a tour de force of resolute belief. For this was all that our essayist could achieve by simply replying to objections, though it was no doubt all that he aimed at achieving.

Many others of you, I moreover suspect, wondered in particular if there might not be some course of thought in which that

____________________
*
The present essay was read to the Berkeley Club in April, 1899. Professor James had read his Ingersoll Lecture to the same company in September, 1898.

-237-

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George Holmes Howison, Philosopher and Teacher: A Selection from His Writings, with a Biographical Sketch
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Preface ix
  • Part One - A Biographical Sketch xv
  • The Teacher 1
  • The Man 16
  • Preparation 32
  • Venture and Disappointment 56
  • Apostolic Opportunity 72
  • Friends 87
  • Part Two - Selected Writings 123
  • Personal Idealism 125
  • Personal Idealism and Moral Aims 139
  • The Limits of Evolution 153
  • Modern Science and Pantheism 190
  • The Many and the One 222
  • Human Immortality: Its Positive Argument - With Reference to the Ingersoll Lecture Of Professor James 237
  • The Harmony of Determinism And Freedom 262
  • The Philosophical Principles In Plato's "Apology" 307
  • The Art-Principle as Represented In Poetry 338
  • Liberal Education And Freedom 358
  • The Duty of the University To the State 369
  • Appendices 381
  • A Partial List of References To Howison in Philosophical Publications 389
  • Index 391
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