Reading I've Liked: A Personal Selection Drawn from Two Decades of Reading and Reviewing

By Clifton Fadiman | Go to book overview

Reading I' ve Liked
A PERSONAL SELECTION DRAWN FROM TWO DECADES OF READING AND REVIEWING PRESENTED WITH AN INFORMAL PROLOGUE AND VARIOUS COMMENTARIES

BY Clifton Fadiman

SIMON AND SCHUSTER NEW YORK 1941

-iii-

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Reading I've Liked: A Personal Selection Drawn from Two Decades of Reading and Reviewing
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Presenting v
  • Acknowledgments IX
  • My Life is an Open Book: Confessions and Digressions of an Incurable XIII
  • Eve Curie 1
  • Four Years in a Shed [From "Madame Curie"] 6
  • Alexander Woollcott 18
  • Entrance Fee 19
  • Ludwig Bemelmans 22
  • Putzi 25
  • Thomas Mann 30
  • Mario and the Magician 33
  • Thomas Mann 77
  • Snow [From "The Magic Mountain"] 82
  • George R. Leighton 116
  • Arminia Evans Avery [From "America's Growing Pains"] 117
  • Vincent Mcchugh 122
  • Vincent McChugh Commentary 122
  • John Dos Passos 143
  • Tin Lizzie [From "U.S.A."] 146
  • The Campers at Kitty Hawk [From "U.S.A."] 155
  • Meester Veelson [From "U.S.A."] 161
  • W. Somerset Maugham 169
  • The Treasure 174
  • The Facts of Life 191
  • George Santayana 210
  • The Unknowable 213
  • H. W. Fowler 233
  • Excerpts from "A Dictionary of Modern English Usage" 235
  • C. K. Ogden 247
  • The New Britannica 250
  • Frank Moore Colby 272
  • Trials of an Encyclopedist 275
  • Confessions of a Gallomaniac 287
  • James Thurber 292
  • My Life and Hard Times 297
  • R. B. Cunninghame Graham 352
  • Success 354
  • Virginia Woolf 359
  • Mr. Bennett and Mrs. Brown 361
  • Hon. John M. Woolsey 380
  • A Decision of the United States District Court Rendered December 6, 1933, by Hon. John M. Woolsey Lifting the Ban on "Ulysses" 382
  • E. M. Forster 389
  • My Own Centenary 391
  • The Consolations of History 394
  • Sarah Orne Jewett 398
  • A White Heron 399
  • Ring Lardner 410
  • The Love Nest 413
  • Ernest Hemingway 426
  • The Snows of Kilimanjaro 435
  • John Steinbeck 459
  • The Red Pony 461
  • Dust [From "The Grapes of Wrath"] 518
  • The Turtle [From "The Grapes of Wrath"] 522
  • M. F. K. Fisher 525
  • The Standing and the Waiting 528
  • César 539
  • Christina Stead 545
  • The Salzburg Tales 547
  • Jules Romains 582
  • A Little Boy's Long Journey [From "Men of Good Will"] 600
  • Portrait of France in July '14 [From "Men of Good Will"] 609
  • How Verdun Managed to Hold Out [From "Men of Good Will"] 623
  • Roger Martin Du Gard 636
  • An Excerpt from "The World of the Thibaults" 640
  • A. E. Coppard 654
  • Felix Tincler 656
  • Arabesque: The Mouse 666
  • Dusky Ruth 673
  • W. F. Harvey 682
  • August Heat 684
  • Max Beerbohm 690
  • James Pethel 691
  • W. Somerset Maugham 709
  • Lord Mountdrago 710
  • Conrad Aiken 734
  • Silent Snow, Secret Snow 736
  • E. B. White 754
  • The Door 755
  • S. J. Perelman 760
  • Is There an Osteosynchrondroitrician in the House? 761
  • Bertrand Russell 764
  • A Free Man's Worship 766
  • Katherine Anne Porter 775
  • Noon Wine 776
  • Kin Hubbard 825
  • The Sayings of Abe Martin 826
  • Donald Culross Peattie 831
  • An Almanac for Moderns 832
  • Thomas Mann 896
  • A Letter 'to the Dean of the Philosophical Faculty of the University of Bonn 897
  • Justice Oliver Wendell Holmes 904
  • Excerpt from a Speech at a Dinner of the Harvard Law School Association of New York on February 15, 1913 905
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