A Study of the Port of New York Authority

By Frederick L. Bird | Go to book overview

Chapter Three The AUTHORITY'S ACCOMPLISHMENTS and PLANS

II. PRESENT AND PROJECTED FACILITIES

THE EARLY POSTWAR YEARS have brought an intensification of the Port Authority's operational, construction and planning activities. The Authority has in well-established operation, on a fully self- supporting basis, six vehicular crossings of the interstate water boundary, an inland freight terminal and a grain terminal. To these facilities it has added, in 1947 and 1948, the City of Newark's marine terminal, Port Newark, and the Port District's three major airports--LaGuardia, Newark and New York International. Early in 1948 it had under construction two union truck terminals, was preparing the site for a great union bus terminal in Manhattan, and had developed and proposed plans for rehabilitation of the waterfronts of the Cities of New York and Hoboken.

The famous undertakings which have already established the Authority's indispensability to the Port District and its reputation for sound financial planning are described, and their operations reviewed, in this chapter, and attention is given, also, to the less well-known but exceedingly valuable non-operational services of the organization. Later chapters will discuss the Port Authority's new enterprises.


Conquering the Interstate Water Boundary

The six vehicular water crossings include two tunnels and a bridge across the Hudson River between New Jersey and Manhattan Island and three bridges across the straits separating New Jersey and Staten Island which, as the Borough of Richmond, is one of the five boroughs of New York City.

-21-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
A Study of the Port of New York Authority
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 193

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.